The Foundation fights pediatric brain tumors

Six-year-old Isaac Clayman is very familiar with the children’s book “Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving?” not just because his mother Samarrah Clayman wrote the story, but because Isaac lived the real thing. “I wrote it a lot for my eldest daughter,” Samarrah Clayman said. hospitalization, and our whole life, our family life, really changed.” Samarrah said that just before Isaac’s second birthday, an MRI revealed that he had a brain tumor. Samarrah and her husband Jeffrey, a cardiologist, had noticed a sudden change in their son. “We were playing in the park,” Samarrah said. “He was running around, and we were there for about half an hour, he just kept tripping. “What was really disturbing was that he kind of lost his stability when he was turning,” Jeffrey said. “He also had abnormal eye movements, which kind of bothered me.” Isaac had a marathon operation followed by a month and a half of radiation therapy. “Five days a week, for six weeks,” Samarrah said. “It took like, I would say a year before we felt like it come back to the boy we had known. In 2018, the Claymans started a foundation to help find treatments for ependymoma, Isaac’s diagnosis. action for ependymoma. The Claymans said not all children can benefit as fully as Isaac from these treatments. Their Ependymoma Research Foundation funds the research. it’s a viable project,” Jeffrey said. The profits from “Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving? which brings together local charities, is an important fundraiser for them and a great community building event. Find more information about the race here.

Six-year-old Isaac Clayman is very familiar with the children’s book, “Will Jax be home for Thanksgiving?” not just because his mother Samarrah Clayman wrote the story, but because Isaac lived the real thing.

“I wrote it a lot for my eldest daughter,” Samarrah Clayman said. “She was four when he (Isaac) went through that hospitalization, and our whole life, our family life, was really turned upside down.”

Samarrah said that just before Isaac’s second birthday, an MRI revealed he had a brain tumor. Samarrah and her husband Jeffrey, a cardiologist, had noticed a sudden change in their son.

“We were playing in the park,” Samarrah said. “He was running around, and we stood there for about half an hour, he kept tripping.”

“What was really disturbing was that it kind of lost its stability when it was turning,” Jeffrey said. “He also had abnormal eye movements, which kind of bothered me.”

Isaac underwent a marathon operation followed by a month and a half of radiotherapy.

“Five days a week, for six weeks,” Samarrah said. “It took, I would say, a year before we felt like he was coming back to the boy we had known.”

In 2018, the Claymans started a foundation to help find treatments for ependymoma, Isaac’s diagnosis.

Currently, surgery and radiation therapy are the only courses of action for ependymoma. The Claymans said not all children can benefit as fully as Isaac from these treatments.

Their Ependymoma Research Foundation funds research.

“I review a lot of research and try to select projects that I think could actually turn into something viable,” Jeffrey said.

Product from “Will Jax be home for Thanksgiving?” support the foundation.

Right now, the Claymans are recruiting runners to participate in the GenesisHR Battlegreen Run in Lexington in November.

They said the run, which brings together local charities, is an important fundraiser for them and a great community-building event.

Find more information about the race here.

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