health care – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 12:20:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://web-xpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-150x150.png health care – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ 32 32 Aaron Carson, MD, Brian Mooney, MD Join UAMS Northwest Arkansas Behavioral Health Clinic https://web-xpress.com/aaron-carson-md-brian-mooney-md-join-uams-northwest-arkansas-behavioral-health-clinic/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 15:05:55 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/aaron-carson-md-brian-mooney-md-join-uams-northwest-arkansas-behavioral-health-clinic/ Enlarge image Aaron Carson, MD, (left) and Brian Mooney, MD have joined UAMS’ Northwestern Arkansas Behavioral Clinic in Fayetteville as psychiatrists. March 14, 2022 | FAYETTEVILLE – Aaron Carson, MD, and Brian Mooney, MD, have joined the newly relocated behavioral health clinic in northwest Arkansas as outpatient psychiatrists. The Fayetteville Clinic offers outpatient mental health […]]]>

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Aaron Carson, MD, (left) and Brian Mooney, MD have joined UAMS’ Northwestern Arkansas Behavioral Clinic in Fayetteville as psychiatrists.

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WORLD GLAUCOMA WEEK: LASG organizes an awareness walk and a free eye pressure check https://web-xpress.com/world-glaucoma-week-lasg-organizes-an-awareness-walk-and-a-free-eye-pressure-check/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:52:11 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/world-glaucoma-week-lasg-organizes-an-awareness-walk-and-a-free-eye-pressure-check/ Regular eye checks will prevent irreversible blindness that can be caused by glaucoma and other blinding conditions. The LAGOS State Department of Health organized an awareness walk and free eye pressure check to commemorate World Glaucoma Week of the year 2022 in Lagos from Sunday March 6 to Sunday March 12, 2022. The Lagos State […]]]>

Regular eye checks will prevent irreversible blindness that can be caused by glaucoma and other blinding conditions.

The LAGOS State Department of Health organized an awareness walk and free eye pressure check to commemorate World Glaucoma Week of the year 2022 in Lagos from Sunday March 6 to Sunday March 12, 2022.

The Lagos State government also took the opportunity to warn citizens to avoid associating with unqualified eye health personnel, adding that regular eye checks will prevent irreversible blindness that can be caused by glaucoma and d other blinding conditions.

Speaking after the sensitization march, the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health, Dr Olusegun Ogboye explained that the patronage of unqualified eye health professionals for eye care services is contrary to the efforts made by the government and relevant stakeholders to reduce the prevalence of preventable diseases. blinding eye conditions.

Dr Ogboye noted that the theme for World Glaucoma Week 2022, “The world is bright, save your sight”, highlights the need for citizens to take responsibility and take good care of their lives. eyes to prevent visual impairment and irreversible blindness caused by Glaucoma and other blinding eye conditions.

He said: “The eye is a very delicate organ in the body that requires proper attention and treatment by licensed eye health professionals. The eye is such a precious gift for all human beings and it is something that we need to pay special attention to. I would tell anyone who patronizes quacks for their eye health care that they need to re-evaluate the importance of their eyes. I know how important my eyes are to me, and I certainly won’t subject them to just anyone to look at them, and I certainly won’t insert any fluids or medications that aren’t recommended.

Dr Ogboye said the awareness walk organized by the Department of Health to commemorate this year’s World Glaucoma Week aims to raise awareness and awareness of the dangers of glaucoma as a silent killer of sight.

Along the same lines, Consultant Ophthalmologist and Director of Medical Administration, Training and Programs at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Funmilayo Shokunbi explained that blindness caused by glaucoma is irreversible and incurable. , but can be successfully managed if detected early enough.

Emphasizing the need for regular eye check-ups as a preventive measure against glaucoma, Dr. Shokunbi noted that citizens over the age of 40, whose family members have glaucoma, have high intraocular (eye) pressure or have had an eye injury or surgery. are at risk for glaucoma.

The ophthalmologist further revealed that the Ministry of Health is arranging free eye screenings and intraocular pressure checks for public servants including members of the Lagos State Executive Council, the body of permanent secretaries as well as officials as part of the week-long Global Glaucoma Commemoration activities in Lagos State.

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Rotary International offers free heart surgery to 50 children in Seychelles https://web-xpress.com/rotary-international-offers-free-heart-surgery-to-50-children-in-seychelles/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 06:41:07 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/rotary-international-offers-free-heart-surgery-to-50-children-in-seychelles/ Rotary International’s Gift of Life program began in 1975 with the primary purpose of helping needy children in need of corrective heart surgery. ((pfree2014) Photo License: CC-BY SA 4.0 Photo License (Seychelles News Agency) – Rotary International offered free heart surgery to 50 children in Seychelles as part of its “Gift of Life” program, the […]]]>

Rotary International’s Gift of Life program began in 1975 with the primary purpose of helping needy children in need of corrective heart surgery. ((pfree2014) Photo License: CC-BY SA 4.0

Photo License

(Seychelles News Agency) – Rotary International offered free heart surgery to 50 children in Seychelles as part of its “Gift of Life” program, the organization’s president said on Tuesday.

Shekhar Mehta made the statement to reporters after meeting Seychelles President Wavel Ramkalawan at State House.

the Gift of Life Program of Rotary International started in 1975 with the main purpose of helping needy children who need corrective heart surgery to give them another breath of life.

Mehta, the first president of Rotary International to visit Seychelles in 53 years, said the children will undergo their operations in a city in India.

Seychelles provides free universal health care to its citizens and the government pays for treatment abroad for those unable to receive treatment at local health facilities. Although there is an increase in specialist treatments in the island nation, some procedures performed by specialists are not available locally.





Shekhar Mehta met with the President of Seychelles, Wavel Ramkalawan, at State House on Tuesday. (Seychelles Nation) Photo License: CC-BY

The organization will also provide surgeons to perform eye surgeries for those in need of the service in the western Indian Ocean island nation.

“Doctors will be able to come here to perform cataract operations on children or adults. If this can be done, the whole backlog can be taken care of,” he said.

Another helper Rotary International provide the health sector with training for Seychellois practitioners.

During his meeting with Ramkalawan, Mehta also said that his organization has come up with audio-visual content for use in schools so that “children don’t just study from the books, but see and hear what they are studying”.

Mehta is in Seychelles as part of his global visit as president of Rotary International “Meeting Rotarians in every country trying to inspire them to do more work and more humanitarian work.

Before meeting Ramkalawan, Mehta planted a coco de mer plant in the famous botanical garden. Coco de mer, the heaviest nut in the world, is endemic to the Seychelles and grows naturally on Praslin and Curieuse islands.

Mehta also revealed that Rotary International will undertake mangrove planting initiatives in the Seychelles.

Rotary is a global organization of more than 1.2 million businesses, professionals and community leaders. There are more than 32,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographic areas. The clubs are not affiliated with any religion or political party and provide voluntary service and humanitarian support.

Seychelles with a population of nearly 100,000 has two Rotary Clubs and these are the Rotary Club of Victoria and the Rotary Club of Victoria-Coco de mer.

The island nation is part of District 9220 along with five other countries: Mauritius, Reunion, Mayotte, Comoros and Djibouti.

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Huggies, Pampers and other diapers could become tax-free in Missouri (LISTEN) https://web-xpress.com/huggies-pampers-and-other-diapers-could-become-tax-free-in-missouri-listen/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 06:17:11 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/huggies-pampers-and-other-diapers-could-become-tax-free-in-missouri-listen/ A visit to Happy Bottoms Diaper Bank in the Kansas City area inspired a Missouri lawmaker to help families with their financial bottom line. State Rep. Patty Lewis, D-Kansas City, filed a bill that would exempt diapers from sales tax. It would cover child and adult diapers. Representative Patty Lewis, D-Kansas City “It was very […]]]>

A visit to Happy Bottoms Diaper Bank in the Kansas City area inspired a Missouri lawmaker to help families with their financial bottom line.

State Rep. Patty Lewis, D-Kansas City, filed a bill that would exempt diapers from sales tax. It would cover child and adult diapers.

Representative Patty Lewis, D-Kansas City

“It was very eye-opening. I think I was a bit naive about how diaper insecurity impacted the whole family, you know, mentally, financially, and from a health care perspective,” says -she.

Lewis points to a study showing that the average Missouri family spends about $1,500 a year on diapers. Currently, diapers are considered a luxury item and are taxed at 4.2%.

“Saving 4.2% of $1,500 would be significant, especially these days,” says Lewis.

When it comes to the health issues that can come from not having diapers, Lewis knows that. She has over 20 years of healthcare experience as a Critical Care/Critical Care Registered Nurse, as well as a Healthcare Director.

“Sitting in dirty diapers for several hours can lead to dermatitis or diaper rash, UTIs. UTIs, if left untreated and/or prolonged, can lead to high blood pressure, kidney failure. I mean that it can be quite significant,” she says.

Lewis says the bill does not exempt sales tax for other diaper-related items, such as baby wipes and diaper rash products.

“According to one of the research papers I had, it was said that in New York and Connecticut, when they enacted a tax exemption on diaper products, they saw an increase in sales of diapers from 5.4% and a reduction in children’s painkillers and purchases of 6.2%,” says Lewis.

According to Lewis, ten states have sales tax exemptions similar to what she proposes. Several states have tax exemptions or a lower tax rate for diapers.

The expected cost to the state is approximately $16-28 million.

The bill has not yet gone to committee.

To view House Bill 2384, click here.

To listen to Show Me Today’s interview with Rep. Patty Lewis, click below.


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Prairie Fare: Refresh your eyes with winter nutrition | Columnists https://web-xpress.com/prairie-fare-refresh-your-eyes-with-winter-nutrition-columnists/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/prairie-fare-refresh-your-eyes-with-winter-nutrition-columnists/ “Look at all that snirt!” exclaimed my husband. Our deep snowbanks were covered in dirt (“snirt”), thanks to strong winds. “I’m so sick of winter,” I replied. He glanced in my direction. I read his mind. “That’s an understatement,” he thought. As we rode that windy day, our world looked like a black and white […]]]>

“Look at all that snirt!” exclaimed my husband.

Our deep snowbanks were covered in dirt (“snirt”), thanks to strong winds.

“I’m so sick of winter,” I replied.

He glanced in my direction. I read his mind.

“That’s an understatement,” he thought.

As we rode that windy day, our world looked like a black and white movie. Luckily, a colorful car or house punctuated the dark color of the exterior.

Like everyone else, I’m waiting for the snow to melt and the snirt to return to the lawns and gardens.

Blades of green grass and tree leaves will be a welcome sight.

We can definitely brighten our days by bringing the color of nature into our kitchens any season of the year. The natural pigments contained in food have beneficial effects on health. In fact, we can help maintain our eyesight and prevent eye disease through our food choices.

People also read…

You might think of carrots and their association with eye health. Carrots and other dark orange and golden vegetables are a healthy option linked to reducing our risk of night blindness. Leafy greens and other colorful foods are more often linked to protecting eyesight.

You may know someone with age-related macular degeneration. This is the deterioration of the central region of the retina called the macula. The “macula” is a region near the optic nerve at the back of our eyes that allows us to see clearly and distinguish colors.

Macular degeneration is one of the main causes of blindness, and scientists have discovered that diet can play a role in preventing this eye disease.

The macula lutea (Latin for “yellow spot”) is made up of lutein and zeaxanthin. We literally feed our eyes with our food. These pigments are found in colorful fruits and vegetables.

Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids from the same group as the familiar beta-carotene found in carrots.

Kale, collard greens and spinach, orange peppers and corn are good sources of zeaxanthin.

Kale, green leafy vegetables, spinach, corn, peas, and yellow and orange vegetables are good sources of lutein. Egg yolks are another great source of lutein.

When enjoying an omelette or scrambled eggs, chop some bell peppers and add chopped spinach or kale to double your eye-healthy pigments.

If you’re a gardener, consider planting vegetables that promote good eye health.

Inspire your gardening with programs offered by NDSU Extension and other extension organizations across the country.

To see www.ag.ndsu.edu/fieldtofork for information on signing up for our “Field to Fork” series, as well as links to many resources.

You don’t have to wait for a farmers market or your own garden. Enjoy colorful produce every day in the produce aisle, freezer section or canning aisle. All forms of vegetables and fruit count towards the recommendations: at least 2 1/2 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit daily for most adults and children.

You can see eye health supplements in the store, and some supplements have shown health benefits, especially for those who lack fruits and vegetables in their diet. Do your homework on supplements and always tell your health care provider which supplements you are taking.

However, aim for healthy foods before you drop bottles of supplements in your shopping cart.

Consider these tips from the National Eye Institute to www.nei.nih.gov support your vision.

See an eye care professional regularly. If you are 50 or older, have a dilation eye exam annually or as recommended by an eye care professional. Age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma can be detected by regular eye exams.

If you smoke, take steps to quit.

Practice regular physical activity.

Maintain normal blood pressure. Do you know your numbers?

Wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat when outdoors in direct sunlight.

Wear safety glasses when working around your home or playing sports.

This colorful recipe is a feast for our eyes and nourishment for our bodies.

Good for your eyes Roasted vegetables

2 cups sweet potatoes, cut into small cubes

1 red bell pepper, chopped

1 yellow squash, sliced ​​and quartered

1 zucchini, sliced ​​and quartered

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons Italian seasoning

salt and pepper to taste)

Preheat oven to 425 F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Place the sweet potatoes in a bowl and add 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar, 1 tsp Italian seasoning, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix to combine. Transfer the vegetable mixture (reserve bowl) to a baking sheet and spread in a single layer. Cook for about 30 minutes, then stir. Place the remaining vegetables in a bowl and add the remaining olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic and Italian seasoning. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Mix to combine. Add to sweet potatoes on a plate. Roast 10 to 15 minutes longer or until tender. The roasting time may need to be adjusted depending on the size of the vegetables. Serve immediately. Note: Feel free to experiment with different vegetables or different seasoning blends.

Makes 12 servings. Each serving contains 80 calories, 1 gram (g) of fat, 2 g of protein, 10 g of carbohydrates, 2 g of fiber and 30 milligrams of sodium.

Julie Garden-Robinson is an NDSU Extension Food and Nutrition Specialist and Professor.

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Black History Month celebrates pioneers https://web-xpress.com/black-history-month-celebrates-pioneers/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 05:35:45 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/black-history-month-celebrates-pioneers/ The Baylor Multicultural Association for Pre-Health Students (MAPS) is dedicated to service and diversity among pre-health students. Photo courtesy of Baylor MAPS. By Megan Hale | Journalist Black History Month provides a concrete opportunity for people of all backgrounds and ethnicities to come together to celebrate the impact of black history on each of our […]]]>

The Baylor Multicultural Association for Pre-Health Students (MAPS) is dedicated to service and diversity among pre-health students. Photo courtesy of Baylor MAPS.

By Megan Hale | Journalist

Black History Month provides a concrete opportunity for people of all backgrounds and ethnicities to come together to celebrate the impact of black history on each of our lives.

“I believe that Black History Month has become this space where black creators and black visionaries can express themselves more about the things they are passionate about, but also a time for us to reflect on how black people contributed to the culture,” said Colleyville senior Dayo Olatunji.

According to a public health report published by the US National Library of Medicine, increasing minority representation in the healthcare workforce is key to supporting the diversity of values ​​across the population as a whole while emphasizing cultural awareness in the way health care practices are delivered.

Olatunji said she grew up very aware of the sacrifice required to be a doctor. Watching her father’s career as a doctor, she saw the business of this lifestyle with her own eyes. However, after volunteering and shadowing at her father’s clinic, she realized the incredible impact he had on members of their community.

“I realized there were people who also needed him because they had never had access to quality health care,” Olatunji said. “And they would come to his clinic, and he knew them by name. He knew the names of their children. He knew what sports their children practiced. He knew their pets. And it was just these deep relationships that he made with them, and I really started to see medicine differently.

Olatunji said she realized through this experience and the example set by her father that caring for and serving others often requires sacrifice.

“I saw that there was a need for relationships in medicine, and I really wanted to be a part of that, and I wanted to be a vocal part of these people’s stories and work for them to get this quality health care. “, said Olatunji.

Olatunji said his personal historical inspiration is Dr. Patricia Era Bath. Bath was an African-American physician, inventor, and researcher. She was the first black woman to complete a residency in ophthalmology, and she is responsible for the invention of laser cataract surgery. While in college, Bath interned at Harlem Hospital in New York. The following year, she completed her fellowship at Columbia University.

“She was able to see, during her fellowship at Columbia, that black people are twice as likely to develop blindness and eight times as likely to develop glaucoma and just much more likely to develop all kinds of visual impairments than their counterparts. whites”, Olatunji mentioned. “And because of that, she’s basically dedicated a lot of her career to making sure people can get quality eye care, no matter what their circumstances.”

The influence of her unique experiences awakened Bath to the systematic issues of diversity in health care, and she dedicated the rest of her career to bringing about change.

Similar to Olatunji, McKinney senior Daphne Simo’s passion for medicine extends far beyond the classroom.

Growing up, Simo said she always had a natural fascination with science, medicine and how diseases affected different people of different ethnicities.

After hearing a lecture given by Dr. Alexa Irene Canady in first grade, Simo said his passion to pursue a career in healthcare was ignited.

“She was a woman who nearly dropped out of college due to her self-confidence and the fact that she didn’t feel empowered enough to continue her journey to become a doctor,” Simo said. “But then something clicked inside her to continue this journey, and so she went to medical school.”

Dr. Canady was the first black female neurosurgeon in the United States, and she eventually became chief of neurosurgery at Michigan Children’s Hospital.

“I told her story and she was really an inspiration to me,” Simo said.

Simo said she is also the president of Baylor’s Multicultural Association for Medical Students (MAPS). According to MAPS websitethis organization seeks to support students of all ethnicities by providing a space for members to learn and appreciate the diverse backgrounds of the individuals who make up patient populations.

“Once I joined MAPS, it really gave me a sense of community, so I could be with people of my color or who have similar experiences,” Simo said.

Olatunji said it’s vital to talk about topics you care about, no matter how popular they are.

“Talk about the things you are passionate about even if you seem like one of the few because there is someone who needs to hear that, and there are people waiting for you on the other side who will need you and who are going to need those insights that you have,” Olatunji said. “You should never be afraid to vocalize those things, no matter the situation.

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UAB Eye Care will begin seeing patients in the 1917 clinic – News https://web-xpress.com/uab-eye-care-will-begin-seeing-patients-in-the-1917-clinic-news/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 20:07:21 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/uab-eye-care-will-begin-seeing-patients-in-the-1917-clinic-news/ This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. Written by: Satina RichardsonMedia Contact: Anna Jones UAB Eye CareThis is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. the clinical arm of the University of Alabama at the Birmingham School of Optometry, will begin […]]]>

This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917.

Written by: Satina Richardson
Media Contact: Anna Jones

UAB Eye CareThis is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. the clinical arm of the University of Alabama at the Birmingham School of Optometry, will begin seeing patients in the 1917 Clinic from February 14. Clinic 1917 is the largest HIV healthcare unit in Alabama and one of the nation’s leading HIV clinics. This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at the clinic.

“We have been seeing Clinic 1917 patients at UAB Eye Care on the UAB campus for some time now, but opening an eye clinic in the new Clinic 1917 space will provide patients with easier access to care and will allow for greater continuity of care,” said Andrew Rothstein, OD, UAB Eye Care’s on-site optometrist.

HIV affects many parts of the body, including the eyes. An estimated 70% of people with AIDS suffer from eye problems, including HIV retinopathy and CMV retinitis. HIV retinopathy is the most common eye problem in people living with HIV and is caused by blockage of blood vessels in the retina. This blockage can lead to visual impairment or loss of vision. CMV retinitis is a viral infection of the retina and is a leading cause of blindness in people living with HIV.

Many eye conditions are asymptomatic in the early stages.

“This patient population is at risk for comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes, and vision screenings can help detect these conditions,” Rothstein said. “Early detection and management of these diseases offers a much better prognosis than if they are detected later.”

Rothstein has a passion for community eye care and looks forward to serving the patients of Clinique 1917.

“I was drawn to optometry by the tangible difference eye care can make in patients’ lives,” he said. “It pains me to know that there are people with treatable vision problems who do not receive care due to barriers such as lack of insurance or transportation. The way the 1917 clinic did Breaking down a lot of those barriers is exciting, and I’m happy to be able to play a small part in that.

Optometry students will join Rothstein at this location. In preparation for the 1917 clinic rotation, they must undergo specific training on the effects of HIV/AIDS on the eyes. Diversity, equity and inclusion education specific to this population is also required.

Clinic 1917 is the largest HIV healthcare unit in Alabama and one of the leading HIV clinics in the country. Its mission is to meet the needs of patients, their families and significant others, physicians and scientists, and the community by addressing the urgent and unique issues surrounding HIV/AIDS.

“Students will benefit tremendously from this experience,” Rothstein said. “This will allow them to experience managing unique eye conditions that are not often seen in the general population. Additionally, they will have the benefit of seeing how eye care fits into a multidisciplinary setting.

Clinique 1917 offers on-site medical and social services to adult patients living with HIV.

“We are very pleased to add eye care services in addition to all the other services we currently provide onsite,” said jim raper, Ph.D., director of Clinique 1917 and professor at the UAB Marnix E. Heersink School of Medicine. “Services now include eye care, dental care, mental health care and specialist medical care. The clinic provides care for insured, low-income, uninsured and underinsured HIV-positive adults, regardless of any pre-existing or non-HIV-related conditions.

Its mission is to meet the needs of patients, their families and loved ones, health care providers and scientists, and the community by addressing the urgent and unique issues surrounding HIV/AIDS. Learn more about the clinic by visiting uabmedicine.org.

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Your guide to lupus and pregnancy https://web-xpress.com/your-guide-to-lupus-and-pregnancy/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 21:57:31 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/your-guide-to-lupus-and-pregnancy/ Not so long ago, people with lupus were advised not to get pregnant. But thanks to new treatments and a better understanding of the disease, this is no longer true. Now many people with lupus can have a safe pregnancy and deliver healthy babies. However, that doesn’t mean the chances of being pregnant while you […]]]>

Not so long ago, people with lupus were advised not to get pregnant. But thanks to new treatments and a better understanding of the disease, this is no longer true.

Now many people with lupus can have a safe pregnancy and deliver healthy babies.

However, that doesn’t mean the chances of being pregnant while you have lupus are completely gone. Blood clots, decreased kidney function, and premature birth can still occur from pregnancy when you have a diagnosis of lupus.

Close monitoring of your condition by your doctor and changes to your lupus treatment may be necessary to keep you and your baby safe.

In this article, we’ll explain the potential risks of pregnancy if you have lupus, what treatment adjustments may be needed, and how you can best prepare.

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease. When lupus is not managed effectively, it attacks healthy tissues in your body, including your organs, blood, and joints.

A lupus flare can affect every system in your body, including your reproductive organs. This is why anyone with lupus who becomes pregnant is considered “high risk.”

But being high risk doesn’t mean everyone with lupus will develop pregnancy complications. And not all pregnancies involving a diagnosis of lupus are in the same risk category.

Lupus is more likely to complicate your pregnancy if you:

  • already have kidney damage (lupus nephritis)
  • have a history of vascular blood clots
  • have irregular blood antibodies
  • recently stopped taking hydroxychloroquine or azathioprine (both are considered safe to take during pregnancy)

People who have well-managed lupus and a plan in place with their doctor before getting pregnant will usually have the best results.

Pregnant women should coordinated care with a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a rheumatologist in addition to an OB-GYN.

Lupus can put you at greater risk for complications such as:

Less often, more serious complications can occur. These less common complications include:

The stage and severity of your lupus plays a role in your specific risks during pregnancy.

When lupus antibodies affect the function of your kidneys, it is called lupus nephritis. This is one of the most serious possible effects of lupus. People with lupus nephritis are at a higher risk of developing high blood pressure and preeclampsia during pregnancy.

People with lupus can also develop antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), also known as Hughes syndrome. If you have APS and become pregnant, your risk of blood clots during pregnancy is higher.

If you had a kidney transplant as a result of lupus, you can still have a healthy pregnancy and give birth safely.

However, since you received an organ transplant, your risk profile is very different from others. You should speak with your health care team before considering or becoming pregnant.

Some medicines used to treat lupus are not safe to take during pregnancy because they can cause birth irregularities.

If you are hoping or trying to get pregnant soon, it is essential that you speak with your doctor about adjustments to your medications. Switching to another medication before pregnancy can give you time to adjust and reduce your risk of having complications later.

Medications considered unsafe during pregnancy include:

Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, which are often prescribed to treat lupus, may be safe in pregnancy with a doctor’s approval. However, these drugs will be prescribed at their lowest recommended dose during your pregnancy.

antimalarial drugs, of which hydroxychloroquineare considered safe and can generally be continued during pregnancy.

the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends avoiding getting pregnant until your lupus is under control or in remission for at least 6 months.

Like other autoimmune diseases, lupus has flare-ups or periods when your symptoms get worse. If you become pregnant while having an active lupus flare, the stress on your kidneys can lead to serious complications.

These include:

  • increased blood pressure
  • blood clots
  • miscarriage

Taking prenatal vitamins and eating a healthy, nutritious diet in the months leading up to your pregnancy can help prevent lupus flare-ups while you’re carrying your baby.

The pregnancy itself is not permanently connected to an increase in lupus flare-ups.

However, changes in your medications as well as additional stress on your body during pregnancy can cause flare-ups while you are carrying your baby.

You may be more likely to have a flare if your disease was particularly active just before conception and in the months following delivery.

It can be confusing and stressful, especially because some of the typical signs of pregnancy can resemble symptoms of a lupus flare-up.

Lupus flare symptoms are usually similar to typical symptoms of the disease, but more severe. You may even experience new symptoms.

These include:

This is where it is essential to be in close communication with your healthcare professionals during pregnancy. They will speak with you to establish a baseline of what the “normal” symptoms will be for you.

If you have an increase in your symptoms during your pregnancy, your doctor may collect and test a urine sample to look for signs of preeclampsia, such as the presence of protein in your urine.

You shouldn’t force yourself to be constantly on high alert, which will cause unnecessary stress. But you should take inventory of your symptoms, writing them down if that helps you keep track.

Preeclampsia and decreased kidney function during pregnancy must be treated immediately for your safety and the health of your baby.

Some people are able to give birth vaginally with lupus. But since your risk of high blood pressure, anemia, and sepsis is higher, your chances of needing a C-section (C-section) are also higher.

Talk to your doctor about your birthing options and create a labor and birth plan in the weeks leading up to your due date.

Most people with lupus are able to breastfeed. But every baby’s feeding journey is different.

If your baby was born prematurely (due to preeclampsia or other complications) and has a low birth weight, you may be advised to supplement breastfeeding with formula.

If you develop high blood pressure during pregnancy, you may need to continue taking blood pressure medication for up to 6 weeks after you give birth.

Before you give birth, you can plan with your doctor how to resume the medications you stopped taking before and during your pregnancy. Some of them are still not safe to take while breastfeeding because they can be passed on to your baby.

You may not be able to resume your old diet immediately.

Pregnancy outcomes for people with lupus are better than ever before. But that doesn’t mean the risks associated with lupus and pregnancy have completely disappeared.

High blood pressure, premature birth, and anemia are some of the possible pregnancy complications if you have lupus.

Certain pre-existing symptoms, including kidney damage and irregular blood antibodies, can increase your chances of a lupus-related pregnancy.

It is important to consult your health care team when planning a pregnancy and to consult specialists. You may need to change your medications, some of which are dangerous for the baby or may increase your risk of serious complications.

It is important to manage your lupus or put it into remission before pregnancy. Together with your doctor, you can create a safe treatment plan for you and your baby to have the healthiest pregnancy possible.

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AI can predict a heart attack – from a routine eye test https://web-xpress.com/ai-can-predict-a-heart-attack-from-a-routine-eye-test/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 22:52:26 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/ai-can-predict-a-heart-attack-from-a-routine-eye-test/ (Getty Images) LEEDS, UK (StudyFinds.org) — An artificial intelligence system is able to detect if someone will have a heart attack in the coming year — through routine eye scanning. A team from the University of Leeds believe this AI tool opens the door to a simple and cheap screening program for the world’s number […]]]>

(Getty Images)

LEEDS, UK (StudyFinds.org) — An artificial intelligence system is able to detect if someone will have a heart attack in the coming year — through routine eye scanning.

A team from the University of Leeds believe this AI tool opens the door to a simple and cheap screening program for the world’s number one killer. Their tests reveal that the computer can predict patients at risk for a heart attack over the next 12 months with up to 80% accuracy. This breakthrough adds to the proof that our eyes are not just “windows to the soul”, but windows to overall healthalso.

“Cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, is the leading cause of premature death worldwide and the second leading cause of death in the UK. This causes chronic health problems and misery all over the world,” says project supervisor Professor Alex Frangi in a university outing.

“This technique opens up the possibility of revolutionizing heart disease screening. Retinal scanners are relatively inexpensive and commonly used in many opticians’ offices. With automated screening, patients at high risk of getting sick could be referred to specialized cardiac services,” adds Frangi.

“The system could also be used to track signs of heart disease.”

Look at the retina to discover red flags in the heart

The retina is a small membrane at the back of the eye containing light-sensitive cells. Doctors have found that changes to tiny blood vessels can reference to vascular diseaseincluding heart problems.

The study authors used an advanced type of AI, known as deep learning, to teach the machine to automatically read more than 5,000 eye scans. The scans come from routine eye tests during visits to opticians or eye clinics. All participants are part of the UK Biobank, which tracks the health of half a million adults.

Deep learning is a complex series of algorithms that allow machines to make predictions based on patterns of data. The technique, described in the review Intelligence of natural machinescould revolutionize cardiac therapy, researchers say.

“The AI ​​system has the potential to identify individuals who participate in routine eye screening who are at higher future risk of cardiovascular disease, whereby preventative treatments could be started earlier to prevent premature cardiovascular disease” , says co-author Professor Chris Gale, consultant cardiologist at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

The study identified associations between retinal pathology and changes in the patient’s heart. Once the system learned each image pattern, the AI ​​was able to estimate the size and pumping efficiency of the left ventricle from the retinal scans alone.

It is one of the four chambers of the heart. An enlarged ventricle can increase the risk of heart disease. The computer combined the estimated size of the left ventricle and its pumping efficiency with data such as age and gender.

Eye scan
An eye scan. (University of Leeds)

The eyes say a lot about sickness and death

Currently, doctors determine this information using an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or echocardiography of the heart. Diagnostic tests are expensive and are often only available at a hospital. Testing may be inaccessible for many people in countries with less modern health systems. They also increase health care costs and waiting times in rich countries.

“The AI ​​system is a great tool for unraveling the complex patterns that exist in nature, and that’s what we found – the complex pattern of changes in the retina linked to changes in the heart,” adds the co. -author Sven Plein of the British Heart Foundation.

A recent study found a similar link between the biology retinal aging and mortality. Those whose retinas were “older” than their actual age were up to 67% more likely to die within the next decade.

South West News Service writer Mark Waghorn contributed to this report.

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Cowra’s Business Faces: Rob Webster | Keeper Cowra https://web-xpress.com/cowras-business-faces-rob-webster-keeper-cowra/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/cowras-business-faces-rob-webster-keeper-cowra/ Since 1960, Webster optometristsThe name is well known throughout Cowra and the district and has helped generations of local residents. As part of our ongoing series, the Keeper Cowra talked to well-known optometrist Rob Webster about following in his father’s footsteps. Tell us a bit about yourself and how long have you been an optometrist? […]]]>

Since 1960, Webster optometristsThe name is well known throughout Cowra and the district and has helped generations of local residents.

As part of our ongoing series, the Keeper Cowra talked to well-known optometrist Rob Webster about following in his father’s footsteps.

Tell us a bit about yourself and how long have you been an optometrist?

I was born in Cowra in 1970 and joined my dad here in 1994 and graduated from the University of NSW in 1992 so quite a few years.

What made you want to become an optometrist?

I was very lucky to have the opportunity to work in the family business.

I naturally turned to health care and optometry seemed like a good choice.

What does a typical day look like?

There is the eye health examination and the prescription of glasses and contact lenses, that’s the main thing.

But I’m more and more assessing whether people are fit to drive because that’s become an increasingly important part of our responsibilities, that kind of testing.

And also over the past 30 years, not only to detect eye disease, but we’ve gotten the right to prescribe a broader list of drugs – eye drops to treat things like glaucoma, dry eye.

I also work very closely with our closest ophthalmologists in Orange and Bathurst.

Dr Basil Crayford comes and we are lucky that he has cataract surgery once a month at Cowra.

Do you have any advice for those considering a career in optometry?

It’s a great advantage, it’s bloodless and there are no afternoons in the normal course of things.

But I fear for them how hard it is to get in, it’s more competitive in terms of numbers than in my time.

Remember there are more universities offering it now.

There were three in my day, I think there are six now.

It’s also a good way to meet a wide range of your local community.

This is all about solving problems and reassuring that there is nothing wrong in their eyes.

Especially when they get older and know someone in the family or a friend who has lost their sight.

But fortunately, even in just 30 years, we can do a lot more for things like macular degeneration.

It’s not as unpleasant a diagnosis as before.

Is there anything people could do to take better care of their eye health?

Apart from giving up cigarettes, but a balanced diet.

It is difficult to draw a direct link between general health and eye health, but diabetes has an alarming rate of young people with serious vision-threatening additions because of it.

Certainly, diabetes seems to be linked to processed foods and our lower dietary standards.

What is it about you that people may not know?

In fact, I like to score in cricket.

I have always enjoyed my participation in junior Cowra cricket.

My son is a bit too old for that at 17, he still plays junior cricket but not Cowra.

Anything else people should know about the life of an optometrist?

One thing about the country in its favor is that you are required to familiarize yourself with a much wider range of illnesses and conditions.

Because you don’t have the number of specialists on hand that you get in city practices.

You have to become a jack-of-all-trades like general practitioners.

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