eye problems – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 12:17:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://web-xpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-150x150.png eye problems – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ 32 32 Kell Brook was a lost soul after losing his world title, but Amir Khan’s fight can bring back the hunger https://web-xpress.com/kell-brook-was-a-lost-soul-after-losing-his-world-title-but-amir-khans-fight-can-bring-back-the-hunger/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 11:00:46 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/kell-brook-was-a-lost-soul-after-losing-his-world-title-but-amir-khans-fight-can-bring-back-the-hunger/ For a man who knew nothing but winning for most of his career, Kell Brook met a murderous end as a boxer. Special K will put their pride on the line against bitter rival Amir Khan on February 19. With no titles around his waist, that’s all he has left – and this could very […]]]>

For a man who knew nothing but winning for most of his career, Kell Brook met a murderous end as a boxer.

Special K will put their pride on the line against bitter rival Amir Khan on February 19. With no titles around his waist, that’s all he has left – and this could very well be the last time we see him in the ring.

The 35-year-old has already had the world at his feet after beating Shawn Porter in Los Angeles eight years ago to become the IBF welterweight world champion.

Kell Brook (above) faces a grudge match with former boxing rival Amir Khan on February 19

With no titles around his waist, the Khan contest is all he has left at 35 to fight

With no titles around his waist, the Khan contest is all he has left at 35 to fight

He reigned for three years before his first two career defeats – in a row – changed everything. His first loss could perhaps be seen as a challenge he was never going to win – a bridge too far as he moved up two weight classes to face the formidable Gennady Golovkin at middleweight.

He was overwhelmed, and you could discuss the damage he suffered – breaking his right eye socket – which he never really recovered from.

It became a vulnerability in his biggest ever world title defense against promising fighter Errol Spence Jr – who targeted the weak area until Brook was forced to take a knee after struggling to see out of his sight .

The referee waved the fight off after seeing Brook distressed with the issue, and results later showed he had fractured his socket for the second time.

Brook (right) has struggled with his eye in recent fights, including against Errol Spence Jr (left)

Brook (right) has struggled with his eye in recent fights, including against Errol Spence Jr (left)

The 35-year-old side also threw in the towel over a similar injury against Gennady Golovkin

The 35-year-old side also threw in the towel over a similar injury against Gennady Golovkin

Brook admitted he was ‘a lost soul’ in 2018 after those two crushing defeats, revealing battles with mental health and how he viewed retirement.

“I was really so low that I didn’t want to continue,” he told the Guardian. ‘People don’t know that. I hit rock bottom around Christmas. I remember sitting by myself thinking, ‘Nobody loves me. What have I done to myself? What have I done to the people who love me?’

“I was at home and my wife and children were out. I thought, ‘I let down people who really loved me. It was very bad. I was thinking of retiring. Things weren’t going so well at home. I was a lost soul – the lowest I’ve ever been.

Brook suffered from bouts of depression and admitted he went out drinking to cope with his mental state – and some days he couldn’t get out of bed, with no offers on the table to get back in the ring.

To add insult to injury, he was facing accusations of ‘quitting’ against Spence Jr, including from fellow fighters Tony Bellew and Chris Eubank Jr, who ‘cut him deep’ so that he revealed the true extent of his eye problems.

Brook (front) admitted he was

Brook (front) admitted he was ‘a lost soul’ in 2018 after those two crushing defeats

“It bothers me that they thought I was giving up,” he said. “Until you get that injury, you’ll never know what it’s like. I might get big puffy eyes, cuts, and I won’t mind. Even though the eye was swollen and I couldn’t see, I would still see through the other eye and continue to fight. But when it’s double vision, it’s like you don’t have eyes.

“It cuts so deep. I’ve been boxing all my life, and there’s no surrender in me, but I couldn’t see. I was badly hurt. What about when you have kids? When the surgeon said one more big hit from Golovkin and you’d go blind? You still wouldn’t stop, but Spence knew I was a wounded animal.

It took a year before Brook returned to the ring after losing to Spence Jr, as Eddie Hearn’s promotional bill dubbed ‘come up’ saw him go super welterweight in search of a new chapter.

He fought three more times in that weight class, but a world title bid never came. He swept Sergey Rabchenko and Michael Zerafa, but spent much of the year chasing a long-awaited dust with Khan – which also didn’t come.

Khan walked away in favor of facing Terrence Crawford – and Brook then didn’t fight at all in 2019. His inactivity left a huge question mark over his career and his relationship with Eddie Hearn – which he accused of hanging it up to dry.

Hearn set up one last fight with Brook against Marc de Luca in 2020 before a frustrated Brook took it upon himself to set up a big fight – heading to the States to seal a lucrative fight against Crawford after striking a deal with Matchroom’s rival company, Top Rank.

“Eddie was always involved in this fight, for six/seven weeks from today he was always involved,” he told iFL.

“He knew the date, we kept him posted, all he had to do was sign the contract for Brook, but he was more interested in signing books. It got to the stage where I was put on the shelf, you know? I am self-directed. I went there and had the fight against Crawford.

Brook's inactivity has raised question marks over her relationship with Eddie Hearn (above

Brook admitted he wasn't worried

Brook’s (right) inactivity has raised question marks over her relationship with Eddie Hearn (left)

“At the end of the day, when all is said and done, I want to be out of this sport with a bag full of cash for my daughters. I’m not going to worry about Eddie putting me on the shelf. He didn’t want to put anyone on the shelf.

“He has millions of fighters, he takes millions away from everyone. He just has too many fighters and so many dates to bring out these top fighters [in the ring] within a certain period of time. If he can’t do some super fights for the fighters, the fighters won’t get money. I needed to be active, I need to have more money. I need to be active and fight.

Brook might have made a small fortune after fighting Crawford in America, in the summer of 2020, but he was no match for the pound-for-pound star as he suffered a fourth-round knockout. He has not fought since.

And Hearn – once a close friend of Brook who traveled home to chart his rise through the ranks throughout his career – lashed out at him after his criticism, accusing him of ‘walking away’ from Matchroom .

Brook defied Hearn's advice by staging his own fight against Terence Crawford in 2020

Brook defied Hearn’s advice by staging his own fight against Terence Crawford in 2020

Brook (right) suffered a fourth-round knockout in that fight with Crawford despite making big money

Brook (right) suffered a fourth-round knockout in that fight with Crawford despite making big money

“To be honest with you, I was really disappointed and quite angry,” Hearn said after Brooks’ words. “I will say this because I feel like 99% of what was said was total b****cks.

“I was never involved in any conversation they had with Top Rank regarding this fight, any consultation, any opinion from me, any part of the deal negotiations.

‘Once you have turned your back on me, never turn around and start walking towards me. Either you’re with me or you’re not. Don’t talk bullshit. You wanted as much money as possible. It’s reality.

“I feel like I have to justify this interview because it was total, total b****cks. I saved his career several times.

Brook's (right) clash with Khan (left) this month is a big chance for a final payout

Brook’s (right) clash with Khan (left) this month is a big chance for a final payout

Stepping into the ring with Khan is the perfect way for the 35-year-old to re-energize

Stepping into the ring with Khan is the perfect way for the 35-year-old to re-energize

With Brook now a free agent, he finally seized the opportunity to face Khan in what could be one last big win as he looks to roll back the years and end his career on a huge high.

Back in the spotlight on Sky Sports, where he fought for much of his career, Brook has a chance to recapture the glory days by brushing aside the forgettable end to his life as a boxer that wasn’t kind to him. .

Getting in the ring with Khan is the perfect way to remotivate himself and focus on boxing again against an opponent he really wants to hurt. He trained hard and will feel like a young fighter again.

His failure to set up this fight in the past has only added to Brook’s turbulent time lately, but now this matchup is finally on track, there’s a weight on his shoulder.

No matter what happens at Manchester Arena, Brook will end his career knowing he was a world champion and one of Britain’s biggest boxing stars for some time. He’s had a tough time since, but for now the fire is back in his stomach.

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UAB Eye Care will begin seeing patients in the 1917 clinic – News https://web-xpress.com/uab-eye-care-will-begin-seeing-patients-in-the-1917-clinic-news/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 20:07:21 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/uab-eye-care-will-begin-seeing-patients-in-the-1917-clinic-news/ This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. Written by: Satina RichardsonMedia Contact: Anna Jones UAB Eye CareThis is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. the clinical arm of the University of Alabama at the Birmingham School of Optometry, will begin […]]]>

This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917.

Written by: Satina Richardson
Media Contact: Anna Jones

UAB Eye CareThis is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at Clinique 1917. the clinical arm of the University of Alabama at the Birmingham School of Optometry, will begin seeing patients in the 1917 Clinic from February 14. Clinic 1917 is the largest HIV healthcare unit in Alabama and one of the nation’s leading HIV clinics. This is the first time that eye care will be provided on-site at the clinic.

“We have been seeing Clinic 1917 patients at UAB Eye Care on the UAB campus for some time now, but opening an eye clinic in the new Clinic 1917 space will provide patients with easier access to care and will allow for greater continuity of care,” said Andrew Rothstein, OD, UAB Eye Care’s on-site optometrist.

HIV affects many parts of the body, including the eyes. An estimated 70% of people with AIDS suffer from eye problems, including HIV retinopathy and CMV retinitis. HIV retinopathy is the most common eye problem in people living with HIV and is caused by blockage of blood vessels in the retina. This blockage can lead to visual impairment or loss of vision. CMV retinitis is a viral infection of the retina and is a leading cause of blindness in people living with HIV.

Many eye conditions are asymptomatic in the early stages.

“This patient population is at risk for comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes, and vision screenings can help detect these conditions,” Rothstein said. “Early detection and management of these diseases offers a much better prognosis than if they are detected later.”

Rothstein has a passion for community eye care and looks forward to serving the patients of Clinique 1917.

“I was drawn to optometry by the tangible difference eye care can make in patients’ lives,” he said. “It pains me to know that there are people with treatable vision problems who do not receive care due to barriers such as lack of insurance or transportation. The way the 1917 clinic did Breaking down a lot of those barriers is exciting, and I’m happy to be able to play a small part in that.

Optometry students will join Rothstein at this location. In preparation for the 1917 clinic rotation, they must undergo specific training on the effects of HIV/AIDS on the eyes. Diversity, equity and inclusion education specific to this population is also required.

Clinic 1917 is the largest HIV healthcare unit in Alabama and one of the leading HIV clinics in the country. Its mission is to meet the needs of patients, their families and significant others, physicians and scientists, and the community by addressing the urgent and unique issues surrounding HIV/AIDS.

“Students will benefit tremendously from this experience,” Rothstein said. “This will allow them to experience managing unique eye conditions that are not often seen in the general population. Additionally, they will have the benefit of seeing how eye care fits into a multidisciplinary setting.

Clinique 1917 offers on-site medical and social services to adult patients living with HIV.

“We are very pleased to add eye care services in addition to all the other services we currently provide onsite,” said jim raper, Ph.D., director of Clinique 1917 and professor at the UAB Marnix E. Heersink School of Medicine. “Services now include eye care, dental care, mental health care and specialist medical care. The clinic provides care for insured, low-income, uninsured and underinsured HIV-positive adults, regardless of any pre-existing or non-HIV-related conditions.

Its mission is to meet the needs of patients, their families and loved ones, health care providers and scientists, and the community by addressing the urgent and unique issues surrounding HIV/AIDS. Learn more about the clinic by visiting uabmedicine.org.

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Retinal laser treatment saved sight https://web-xpress.com/retinal-laser-treatment-saved-sight/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 16:04:26 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/retinal-laser-treatment-saved-sight/ Toni Smith has had eye problems all her life, but her current healthcare journey began three years ago on a beautiful summer day when she and her husband, Gary, were planning a trip to the island to a friend’s cabin. Things changed in an instant with an appointment with an eye doctor who told her […]]]>

Toni Smith has had eye problems all her life, but her current healthcare journey began three years ago on a beautiful summer day when she and her husband, Gary, were planning a trip to the island to a friend’s cabin.

Things changed in an instant with an appointment with an eye doctor who told her she was facing permanent eye damage.

The situation began when her optometrist discovered a tear in her retina – which turned out to be linked to her extreme myopia – as well as several areas in both eyes where more tears were possible.

“It kind of threw me down a path that I’m still processing,” Smith said.

Her family doctor confirmed the severity of her condition and sent her to the eye doctor, who told her she needed surgery immediately.

Smith said the thought of emergency eye surgery was scary.

“It’s just not a lot of fun and it’s scary, and thank goodness for the equipment we have and the doctors we have here in Victoria.”

A retinal laser was used on her by Dr. Murray Erasmus.

“If I hadn’t had this equipment available to me right away, the retina could have come off and I could have gone blind,” she said. “Once they completely detach, it becomes much more difficult to save sight.”

Despite everything, she was treated quickly and was able to make the trip to the cabin.

“It was weird to me that all of this happened, all on a Friday, and we were actually able to take this trip,” she said. “That’s how incredibly good it is, that they can fix you like that and then you can keep going.”

Talking about her retinas — the membrane on the inner surface of the back of the eye — was new to her, Smith said.

“When I learned to crawl, I was crawling straight into walls, so I was born with poor eyesight,” she said. “I always had issues with my eyes and everything, but I never really knew much about the retina stuff.”

Retinas change over time, the 56-year-old said.

“It’s just that they degenerate with age, so as you get older, the retinas get thinner,” Smith said.

“I honestly didn’t know I had to watch this until it happened.”

One clue turned out to be that she was determined about 10 years ago not to be a candidate for a Lasik procedure, which would have allowed her to stop using glasses and contacts. He was told there wasn’t enough tissue with his retinas.

“I thought, ‘That was disappointing’, but I still didn’t realize there was an impending problem.”

The retinal laser was a godsend for her, Smith said.

“I can’t be thankful enough that this is available to me and that the doctors are giving up everything to make sure my eye gets fixed,” she said.

“It was amazing the care I received.”

His procedures had a cumulative effect.

“After all the surgeries I’ve had, I’m left with a lot of blinks and spots floating in front of my eyes,” Smith said.

“It’s getting a little harder for me to tell when things are really bad or not, so I have to have them checked regularly.

“It’s something, unfortunately, that I have to live with and worry about.”

His last operation dates back to Wednesday.

The region’s retinal laser, which doctors use to perform up to 25 laser treatments a week on people like Smith, is aging and needs replacing.

One of the many goals of the Victoria Hospitals Foundation’s Emerging Stronger campaign is to fund a new retinal laser at a cost of $159,000, which means the current unit can be used as a backup unit.

This unit is 15 years old and does not have a backup itself in case it has any issues.

“The retina machine that the foundation is buying is so badly needed,” Smith said. “How fantastic is it to have two machines?

She explained that current technology can be “uncomfortable and not pleasant” for patients.

“This new machine definitely makes it easier,” Smith said. “The downtime is also minimal, which is amazing to me.”

To donate to Emerge Stronger, go to victoriahf.ca or call 250-519-1750.

jbell@timescolonist.com

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World Leprosy Day: why we cannot yet forget this disease; how it affects the body | Health https://web-xpress.com/world-leprosy-day-why-we-cannot-yet-forget-this-disease-how-it-affects-the-body-health/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 05:48:10 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/world-leprosy-day-why-we-cannot-yet-forget-this-disease-how-it-affects-the-body-health/ Leprosy or Hansen’s disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by a slow-growing bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). It is difficult to contract and most people will never develop the disease even if they are exposed to leprosy bacilli. People who live near very advanced leprosy patients for a long time are at risk of […]]]>

Leprosy or Hansen’s disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by a slow-growing bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). It is difficult to contract and most people will never develop the disease even if they are exposed to leprosy bacilli. People who live near very advanced leprosy patients for a long time are at risk of contracting the disease.

Leprosy mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. Some of the symptoms include patches of discolored skin, growths (nodules) on the skin, thick, stiff, or dry skin, painless ulcers on the soles of the feet, numbness in the affected areas of the skin, muscle weakness or paralysis, eye problems that can lead to blindness

World Leprosy Day is observed in India on January 30 every year on the anniversary of the death of Mahatma Gandhi, while the day is observed annually on the last Sunday across the world. The day aims to celebrate people who have experienced leprosy, raise awareness of the disease and call for an end to the stigma and discrimination associated with leprosy.

READ ALSO : Communicating correct knowledge about leprosy is the key to early detection and treatment

The Don’t Forget Leprosy awareness campaign was launched by Yohei Sasakawa, WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Leprosy Elimination in August 2021, which aims to prevent leprosy from disappearing amid the Covid pandemic and to ensure that the needs of those affected by the disease are not overlooked.

In an email interview with HT Digital, Dr Joydeepa Darlong, Knowledge Management Officer, The Leprosy Mission Trust, talks about leprosy, its symptoms, treatment and the stigma attached to the disease.

What are the causes of leprosy?

Leprosy, often known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the slow-growing bacterium M. leprae. When a leprosy patient coughs or sneezes, droplets containing the bacteria can be inhaled by another person and thus transmitted. Most cases of leprosy transmission occur due to repeated and prolonged contact with an infected, undiagnosed and untreated person.

Tell us more about the infection that causes the disease.

Leprosy is an age-old disease and was previously considered a highly contagious disease, but we now understand that it spreads slowly and is easily treated once diagnosed early. However, there remains a lot of stigma and prejudice about the disease, especially among people with malformations and those who suffer from it are isolated and discriminated against in many places where the disease is seen. A continued commitment to fighting stigma through awareness, early treatment and improving access to treatment will lead to a world free of this completely treatable disease.

What are the symptoms of leprosy?

Leprosy mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. This nerve damage can lead to loss of sensation in the arms and legs and cause muscle weakness. Numbness in the palms and soles can cause accidental injury and burns leading to ulcers and loss of fingers. This can lead to disfigurement in patients. It can also affect the eyes and ultimately lead to blindness.

How is it transmitted from person to person?

Bacteria that cause leprosy are spread through small droplets from the nose and mouth of infected people. It is important to understand that the bacteria is not spread by simple contact with an infected person, such as a handshake, a hug or sitting next to them on a bus or at a table during a meal. It can only be caught if it comes into close and repeated contact with nasal and oral droplets from a person with untreated leprosy.

Leprosy cannot be transmitted to unborn children by pregnant women with the disease. It is also not transmitted through sexual contact.

How to prevent or cure leprosy?

Leprosy mainly affects the skin, eyes, peripheral nerves and upper respiratory tract. The disease is curable with a combination of antibiotics including dapsone with rifampin and clofazimine called combination chemotherapy (PCT).

If leprosy is detected in time, most cases can be cured between 6 and 12 months if PCT is ingested correctly and regularly. Multidrug therapy is offered by Novartis to the World Health Organization (WHO) and is provided free of charge by the government. Over the past 20 years, more than 16 million leprosy patients have been treated with MDT.

How does leprosy affect the nerves?

Leprosy can affect the peripheral nervous system (PNS) by:

• Sensory nerve damage: When sensory nerves are damaged, they cannot register pain, touch, and temperature. This leaves the extremities of the hands and feet vulnerable to burns and injuries that can lead to the loss of fingers, toes, hands and feet.

• Ocular nerve damage: When the eye is affected, it can lead to blindness, especially if the person does not know how to prevent injury from dust or other irritants.

Can you elaborate on its complications if not treated in time?

Without treatment, leprosy can permanently damage the skin, nerves, arms, legs, feet and eyes.

Complications of leprosy can include:

• Blindness or glaucoma

• Iritis/inflammation of the iris

• Facial disfigurement (including permanent swelling, lumps and bumps)

• Muscle weakness resulting in claw-like hands or inability to move the feet

• Permanent damage to the inside of the nose, which can lead to nosebleeds and a chronic stuffy nose

• Nerve damage can lead to a dangerous loss of feeling. If you have leprosy-related nerve damage, you may not feel pain when you have cuts, burns, or other injuries to your hands, legs, or feet.

If left untreated, leprosy affects the nerves and muscles of the patient’s hands and feet, eventually leading to severe deformities and permanent impairment, which have become stigmatizing symbols associated with the disease.

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Pandemic stress worsens teens’ gastrointestinal problems https://web-xpress.com/pandemic-stress-worsens-teens-gastrointestinal-problems/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 15:24:11 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/pandemic-stress-worsens-teens-gastrointestinal-problems/ Did you know that the gut and the brain are connected? They’re like best friends, “texting” all day through the gut-brain axis. When the brain becomes anxious, the gut also feels “upset.” Even Merriam-Webster acknowledged the strong connection by adding “hangry” to the dictionary in 2018. The pandemic is like a bully, picking on best […]]]>

Did you know that the gut and the brain are connected? They’re like best friends, “texting” all day through the gut-brain axis. When the brain becomes anxious, the gut also feels “upset.” Even Merriam-Webster acknowledged the strong connection by adding “hangry” to the dictionary in 2018. The pandemic is like a bully, picking on best friends and making their lives miserable. Gastrointestinal issues are common among teens, and pandemic stress is no friend. Here are some gastrointestinal issues that stressed teens may experience:

Constipation is having less than two bowel movements per week, having stools that are dry, hard, or difficult to pass, and feeling like some of the stool hasn’t passed. Constipation can be caused by a diet that does not contain enough water and fiber or by certain medications (such as iron), medical conditions such as thyroid problems, and stress. Symptoms include abdominal pain, feeling full or bloated, straining to have a bowel movement, and bleeding from anal fissures (tears) from straining.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when food and stomach acid back up into the esophagus. The cause of GERD is the lower esophageal sphincter, which separates the esophagus from the stomach, relaxing at the wrong time or not closing as tightly as it should. GERD that often occurs is called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Symptoms of GERD include a burning sensation in the chest (“heartburn”), burping, frequent hiccups, vomiting after meals, bad breath, and frequent tooth decay. Symptoms tend to get worse after meals and when lying down. For some people, stress can make symptoms worse.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that affects the large intestine. The exact cause of IBS is not known, but it is likely a combination of genetics, the immune system and something in the environment that triggers inflammation (redness and swelling) in the tract gastrointestinal. Symptoms include diarrhea or constipation (or both), cramps, abdominal pain, bloating, and gas. IBS is a chronic disease that requires long-term management. Infections, certain foods and beverages, such as milk, chocolate, caffeinated beverages, carbonated foods, and fatty foods, and stress can trigger IBS symptoms.

Gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach lining. Gastritis can be caused by chronic vomiting, overuse of certain medications (such as ibuprofen), alcohol, smoking, abdominal injuries, certain bacterial and viral infections, and stress. Symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, hiccups, loss of appetite, dark stools, vomiting blood, or feeling hungry at night or between meals.

Ulcers are painful open sores in the stomach and small intestine. Chronic gastritis, bacterial infections (including H. pylori), certain medications, and smoking can cause ulcers. Symptoms may include weight loss, sudden, sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, bloody stools, and dark stools.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term for two conditions (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) that cause chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Many factors, including genetics and the immune system, contribute to IBD. Crohn’s disease can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. Ulcerative colitis only occurs in the large intestine. The most common symptoms of IBD are abdominal pain and diarrhea, but they can also cause constipation, rectal bleeding, anal fissures, and weight loss. Other problems seen with IBD are skin rashes, eye problems, joint pain and arthritis, as well as liver problems. Stress can make symptoms worse.

When should parents take their teenager to the emergency room? Although many of the above conditions can be treated at home with the help of your primary care provider (PCP), more severe symptoms may warrant taking your teen to the emergency room. Your PCP can help you decide if you need to go to the emergency room. Reasons to go to ED include:

  • Severe abdominal pain may signal a surgical emergency.

  • Pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen may be a surgical emergency such as appendicitis or ovarian torsion

  • Abdominal pain accompanied by high fevers can be a serious infection.

  • The inability to eat or drink anything for more than 24 hours can lead to dehydration.

  • Recurrent episodes of blood in the vomiting or stool can signal active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

Trust your instincts. If your child looks seriously ill, go to the emergency room or call 911. For more information on managing stress, visit kidshealth.org/en/parents/stress.html.

Rima Himelstein is an adolescent physician and Sydney Kuzoian is a third-year pediatric resident at Nemours Children’s Hospital, Delaware.

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If you’re over 65, avoid driving at sunrise and sunset — Best Life https://web-xpress.com/if-youre-over-65-avoid-driving-at-sunrise-and-sunset-best-life/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:01:32 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/if-youre-over-65-avoid-driving-at-sunrise-and-sunset-best-life/ More and more adults over the age of 65 are choosing to keep driving as they age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While it’s a great way to stay mobile and independent as you age, the risk of being injured or killed in a car crash tends to increase as […]]]>

More and more adults over the age of 65 are choosing to keep driving as they age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While it’s a great way to stay mobile and independent as you age, the risk of being injured or killed in a car crash tends to increase as we age due to a number of body-related changes. age that can affect how we drive. Nearly 700 seniors are injured each day in motor vehicle crashes in the United States, and more than 20 adults are killed as a result, according to the CDC. But that doesn’t mean you should give up driving altogether if you’re over 65, you may just need to avoid driving in certain circumstances. Read on to find out what you should watch out for when driving in old age.

RELATED: If You’re Over 65, Never Do This With Your Phone, Experts Warn.

iStock

If you notice the sun rising or setting, you shouldn’t take the driver’s seat when you’re older. “Try to avoid driving during sunrise and sunset, when the sun may be directly in your line of sight,” the National Institute on Aging (NIA) states in the “Older Drivers” section of its website. According to the NIA, this warning comes because “your eyesight may change as you age.” As a result, adults aged 65 and over have more difficulty seeing when driving at certain times of the day.

“Several problems are linked to an aging eye that can cause problems for older people while driving, especially at specific times like sunset and sunrise,” explains Mark Davis, MD, physician working with Pacific Analysis.

Ophthalmologist examining patient's eyes
iStock

Although many vision changes occur as you age, there is one that specifically impairs your ability to see while driving at sunrise or sunset. According to Davis, the “most significant structural change” that occurs with age is a decrease in the size of your pupil.

“Due to the reduced pupil size, the eyes of the elderly become more sensitive to bright glare from the sun. The glare from the sun can disturb or hit the weakened pupils of the elderly and prevent them from seeing the road clearly, which which increases the risk of an accident,” he explains. The NIA also confirms this on its website. “Depending on the time of day, the sun can be blinding,” the agency says.

Another issue is that adults 65 and older have a “higher likelihood of having cataracts,” according to Norman Shedlo, OD, an optometrist with the Eyecare Center of Maryland. “If you have cataracts, you’re going to get more and more glare when light shines directly into your eyes. So the glare from sunlight will appear even brighter and be even more disorienting,” he explains. -he.

RELATED: For more health news, sign up for our daily newsletter.

Driving in a night landscape, hands on the wheel.
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If you are over 65, you are safest when driving between sunrise and sunset, not before, during, or after. Elderly people may also have trouble seeing things clearly at night, according to the NIA. When you’re older, driving at night becomes dangerous for some of the same reasons that driving at sunrise or sunset is dangerous. “Small students are unable to see things clearly at night,” warns Davis.

Your eyes could also be affected by “increasing glare from bright headlights” when driving at night, according to Shedlo. “Reduce or stop driving at night if you have trouble seeing in the dark,” advises the NIA.

Happy mature woman driving a car
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Driving at sunrise, sunset, or at night aren’t the only issues people are likely to face when driving as an older adult. The American Optometric Association (AOA) states that many age-related vision changes that typically affect driving can begin in your 60s. Some of these other concerns include “not being able to see road signs as clearly, difficulty seeing close objects like the car dashboard or road maps, difficulty judging distances and speed , changes in color perception and loss of side vision,” according to the agency.

“Many eye diseases have no early symptoms. They can develop painlessly, and you may not notice changes in your vision until the disease is advanced enough,” says the AOA. “Age-related vision changes and eye disease can negatively affect your driving abilities, even before you are aware of the symptoms.”

RELATED: If You’re Over 60, Never Wear It While Driving, Doctors Warn

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Know the effects of increased screen time on eye health https://web-xpress.com/know-the-effects-of-increased-screen-time-on-eye-health/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 05:41:36 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/know-the-effects-of-increased-screen-time-on-eye-health/ Without a doubt, there’s been an unprecedented leap in screen time that we’ve all committed to since the pandemic hit. Whether for educational, entertainment and leisure purposes or for work, a fully-fledged digital lifestyle increasingly defines us. Indeed, as part of this lifestyle change, working from home has become a more permanent feature of our […]]]>

Without a doubt, there’s been an unprecedented leap in screen time that we’ve all committed to since the pandemic hit. Whether for educational, entertainment and leisure purposes or for work, a fully-fledged digital lifestyle increasingly defines us. Indeed, as part of this lifestyle change, working from home has become a more permanent feature of our daily routine.

Working from home comes at a cost to eye health

“But, do we realize that the increased adoption of the work-from-home routine comes at a cost in terms of eye health. As we spend more and more time on digital screens, including laptops, cellphones , tablets, e-readers and even televisions, our eyes have a disproportionately increased exposure time to these screens with far reaching adverse consequences,” said Dr. Tushar Grover, Medical Director, Vision Eye Centre, New Delhi .

Reduce your screen time. (Photo: Pexels)

Symptoms

Increased screen time and resulting eye problems can be assessed through a range of symptoms. These can take the form of “eye strain, headaches, blurred vision or double vision, dry eyes, or even neck and shoulder pain.” Sometimes it can even lead to trouble sleeping and difficulty concentrating,” the expert said.

Computer Vision Syndrome, the big eye problem

He added that excessive screen time can also lead to “computer vision syndrome” or “digital eye strain”. Besides the movement of our eyes, focusing and refocusing on a computer or other digital screens requires extra effort from the eye muscles and the vision system. “If we consider screen glare, contrast and flicker, it becomes even more painful and uncomfortable for our eyes. Also, when we are engrossed in our screens, we tend to blink less, which which leads to dry eyes with related consequences. People reaching 40, in particular, need to exercise more as their natural lenses become less flexible,” he explained.

Those who wear glasses also have problems

While people with untreated or undertreated vision problems will have more problems for obvious reasons, those who wear eyewear such as glasses and contact lenses should also be just as careful. “Screen use, especially at home, is often associated with poor posture and poor home lighting. The viewer is often forced to tilt their head, not only to compound eye discomfort, but also to cause back and neck pain,” he said.

Posture and lighting should be considered when working from home. (Photo: Pexels)

What must we do ?

Of course, reducing or “adjusting” screen time is the first step to consider. Second, placing the computer or any other screen in a well-lit space should become a priority. Third, an adequate distance – preferably at arm’s length – and an appropriate viewing angle between the individual and the screen should be maintained. Fourth, use glasses and lenses that filter out blue rays and have UV protection. “Fifth and very importantly, the 20-20-20 rule must be adhered to, which means that every 20 minutes a person using a screen must look about 20 feet away for at least twenty seconds. It would give the eyes a well-deserved rest on a regular basis,” he suggested.

So while working from home and the resulting increase in screen time has many benefits, there are also downsides when it comes to our eye health. A study reports that almost 23% of India’s population had suffered from some impairment of eyesight during the increase in homestays due to the pandemic. As such, while we can’t completely get rid of our screens, we should exercise caution. Moderation is the key here.

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The review took me straight to A&E but the amazing NHS was there for me https://web-xpress.com/the-review-took-me-straight-to-ae-but-the-amazing-nhs-was-there-for-me/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 08:44:43 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/the-review-took-me-straight-to-ae-but-the-amazing-nhs-was-there-for-me/ [ad_1] An ECHO reporter has spoken of the frightening moment he was told to go straight to A&E after having his eye examined – and the incredible care he received from the NHS. Political editor Liam Thorp had suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in his right eye “for weeks” before going to the […]]]>


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An ECHO reporter has spoken of the frightening moment he was told to go straight to A&E after having his eye examined – and the incredible care he received from the NHS.

Political editor Liam Thorp had suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in his right eye “for weeks” before going to the optician.

After further inspection, the 33-year-old was asked to go straight to the hospital where he was diagnosed with retinal detachment.

READ MORE:Mersey Tunnel toll prices set to rise for the first time in five years

Here our political editor pays tribute to the incredible work of our NHS heroes and why we must protect him at all costs.

In an article written in 2015, Dr Neil Shastri-Hurst, the recently defeated Conservative Party candidate in the North Shropshire by-elections, asked if it was “really worth fighting for the NHS”.

Dr Shastri-Hurst, who lost to the Lib Dems after a historic departure from his party last month, wrote that “health rationing has always happened, but maybe it is time to be more frank and honest on what we can realistically afford in a public system ”.

He is not the only one to have put forward such ideas. There are a number of voices who like to periodically question the future of our free national point-of-use health service.

I have always been passionate about the NHS and believe that supporting and protecting this unique and remarkable institution is of the utmost importance to our society.

Fortunately for me, until now this passion has not come from real personal experience.

At the age of 33, I was fortunate enough to avoid any major health problems or the need for serious surgery or treatment.

Well, that was the case until about a month ago.

Having suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in my right eye for a few weeks, I went to the optician, naively believing that my problems would be quickly resolved with a new prescription for glasses or perhaps eye drops. the eyes.

Sadly, the expression of concern I saw etched on the optician’s face told a different story and he told me to rush to the hospital.

We are extremely fortunate here in Liverpool to have access to the world famous St Paul’s Eye Hospital, which is attached to the Royal Liverpool Hospital.

It is a highly respected specialist facility that people travel to from far and wide for all kinds of eye problems.

The situation in my right eye – which included dangerously high pressure – meant that upon arriving at St Paul’s that afternoon, I was immediately seen and quickly diagnosed with retinal detachment.



Liam Thorp after undergoing retinal detachment surgery

It’s a problem that occurs when the retina – a crucial part of the eye that sends visual images to the brain – is moved away from its normal position.

It is a very serious problem which is likely to cause blindness without urgent treatment and I have been told that I will need emergency surgery in a few days.

It was a real shock and something that took a long time to process. I had initially hoped to go to work after my hospital visit – but the reality of the situation meant I wouldn’t be back at my desk for weeks.

But that initial shock – and the emotions that naturally followed – have been tempered by an overwhelming sense of gratitude to those who are doing all they can to make things better.

This included the first nurse I met in the ER, Melissa, who managed to let me know that there were serious concerns about the situation with my eyes, all the while making me laugh and feel awkward. ease – a Scouse specialist skill.

Or Dr Ken, a surgeon from Malaysia via New Zealand – who would be part of the operating team later in the week. He calmly explained to me what had happened and what he and his team would do to fix it.

The combination of kindness, care, skill and expertise was amazing and kept me relatively comfortable during what has been quite a disturbing time in my life.

I was raised in the love and admiration of our National Health Service and now, for the first time in my personal experience, I was discovering exactly why this is such a unique and vital institution that we are so fortunate to have. ‘have access.

The following days were a bit hazy (metaphorically and literally) of return visits to St Paul for preoperative analysis and discussion and this crucial combination of kindness and expertise was reflected in every member of staff at the NHS I have been in contact with. with.

The surgery came later in the week and although I was a little anxious to be woken up for the operation with only a local anesthetic in place, I couldn’t help but be impressed as I listened. the surgeons discuss the complexity of the work they were doing on my eye.

A nurse sat next to me and held my hand throughout the operation. A simple act of kindness and compassion that was hugely appreciated as I tried to keep my cool.

I have also been impressed by the medical advancements which mean that such delicate and skillful surgery is now relatively common for the NHS.

In his memoirs, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown speaks of undergoing an then experimental retinal detachment operation in 1971.

Brown had previously lost his sight in his left eye after a rugby injury and was at risk of going completely blind from a detachment from the other – without the efforts of an Indian surgeon called Dr Hector Chawla, who had performed research on such treatments. .

As Brown writes, it was in part thanks to Dr. Chawla’s breakthroughs that the success rate for retinal reattachment rose from 20% to 90% in the 40 years after his own surgery.

As for my own operation, I was told it was a success and that my retina had been reattached, which was a huge relief to hear.

I am now in a period of waiting and hoping that the sight in my right eye will improve – it remains quite blurry and could take a few weeks before I know how things will turn out in the longer term, but progress are on track.



Echo political editor Liam Thorp underwent emergency surgery for retinal detachment in his eye
Echo political editor Liam Thorp underwent emergency surgery for retinal detachment in his eye

I am in regular contact with the brilliant team at St Paul’s who continue to guide me through this troubling time, I am eternally grateful to them.

A thought that often crossed my mind in the weeks following my sudden diagnosis and surgery is how much more difficult this situation would have been if I had received a big financial bill immediately after,

This would be the case for patients in many other countries – and while our politicians publicly promise to keep health care free, recent changes in policy and storytelling suggest we should definitely be concerned about the direction of travel.

Over the past two decades, charges have been introduced for secondary care in the NHS for those who are not ‘usual residents’.

The rules have become particularly strict in England in recent years under the government’s “hostile environment” policies.

A recent report by the Institute for Public Policy Research found that the current NHS pricing system requires migrants to pay 150% of the cost of their health care.

The report says the system is a threat to public health care because it deters and delays people from seeking treatment and has been plagued with accusations of racial profiling and poor decision-making – while being very costly to to supply.

When establishing the NHS, Nye Bevan wrote that “no society can legitimately call itself civilized if a sick person is denied medical help for lack of means”. There are genuine fears that this principle is already being sidelined in some aspects of healthcare in this country – and that the worst could be yet to come.

I am fortunate that when things suddenly turned badly for me, I didn’t have to worry about whether showing up for emergency treatment might get me in trouble with the Ministry of Health. ‘Interior – and I’m lucky to live in a country where I didn’t have to think about how I could afford to pay for the surgery I desperately needed.

Our National Health Service is a phenomenal creation, the best example of a company working together to create something that we will all need at some point in time – sometimes when we least expect it.

We must do everything to protect it.

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For Your Good Health: Cataract Surgery Replaces Cloudy Lens For Clearer Vision | Lifestyles https://web-xpress.com/for-your-good-health-cataract-surgery-replaces-cloudy-lens-for-clearer-vision-lifestyles/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 14:50:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/for-your-good-health-cataract-surgery-replaces-cloudy-lens-for-clearer-vision-lifestyles/ [ad_1] DEAR DR. ROACH: When should a person have cataract surgery and can they ever be removed? I am worried because I am a 65 year old male with cataracts. Can glasses be prescribed so that I never need surgery? I ask because I know people who have had surgery and had a special lens […]]]>


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DEAR DR. ROACH: When should a person have cataract surgery and can they ever be removed? I am worried because I am a 65 year old male with cataracts. Can glasses be prescribed so that I never need surgery? I ask because I know people who have had surgery and had a special lens (may I add, not covered by insurance) and did well at first and then lost their sight due to ‘inflammation behind the eye and had to use prescription eye drops for weeks. I don’t want this same problem. – Anon.

RESPONNSE: The lens of the eye, along with the cornea, bends the light entering the eye so that it is perfectly focused on the retina. The lens should be completely translucent. However, as people get older, they are likely to develop an opacity in the lens, called a cataract. (A cataract is another name for a waterfall, so called because of the foamy white appearance of an advanced cataract.) Cataract surgery replaces the opaque lens with a synthetic lens. Glasses do not specifically help with cataracts, although even a person with cataracts may need corrective lenses.

Not all cataracts require surgery: a cataract should be removed when it interferes with a person’s daily functions. There is no age limit for cataract surgery. Cataract surgery has been shown to have significant benefits, including reducing the risk of serious traffic accidents and hip fractures.

There are different types of lenses that can be put on by the ophthalmologist, the doctor who performs this type of surgery. Some of them have an increased cost to the patient compared to the “ordinary” monofocal lens. The results are generally good: 96 percent of people without eye problems before surgery had visual acuity of 20/40 or better after surgery. The rate of serious complications (hospitalization or death) is around 0.3 percent in a major journal. It looks like the person you know has had endophthalmitis, an inflammation caused by an infection, which often affects vision. This only happens about 0.04 percent of the time. Lens implants should not need to be removed.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am due to have total knee replacement surgery and I am worried that I will have a very large hiatus hernia and when I am completely flat I can feel the hernia rise higher in my esophagus. At home, I have the head of my bed raised about 6 inches, and that helps me tremendously. For my operation, the bed will be completely flat for several hours in preparation, during surgery and during recovery. Should I be worried that there will be complications lying flat for such a long time? – JR

RESPONNSE: The diaphragm’s “hiatus” is a hole – a normal structure that allows the esophagus to pass from the chest to the abdomen so that your food can go into the stomach.

In people with the most common form of hiatus hernia, called a sliding hiatus hernia, the hole has grown large enough that the top of the stomach can move up into the chest, where it does not belong. This is often asymptomatic, but can make reflux symptoms worse. Sliding hiatus hernias (over 95% of hiatus hernias are of this type), where the stomach can move up and down through the hiatus, are not dangerous.

During the operation, the upper stomach may indeed migrate into the chest, but this is very unlikely to cause you any problems.

– Dr Roach regrets not being able to respond to individual letters, but will include them in the column whenever possible. Readers can send questions by email to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or by mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

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MRI is an important diagnostic tool – Estes Park Trail-Gazette https://web-xpress.com/mri-is-an-important-diagnostic-tool-estes-park-trail-gazette/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 16:12:40 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/mri-is-an-important-diagnostic-tool-estes-park-trail-gazette/ [ad_1] After a visit to the Doctors’ Clinic and an ultrasound, Jazmine, 64, was suspected of having ovarian cancer, the deadliest gynecological cancer. The MRI revealed the exact location of the tumor, which was not on the ovary, but nearby. Because Jazmine received care at the EPH, she was able to make her MRI appointment […]]]>


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After a visit to the Doctors’ Clinic and an ultrasound, Jazmine, 64, was suspected of having ovarian cancer, the deadliest gynecological cancer. The MRI revealed the exact location of the tumor, which was not on the ovary, but nearby. Because Jazmine received care at the EPH, she was able to make her MRI appointment within 24 hours of her ultrasound, which made a significant difference in her diagnosis and treatment plan.

MRI is used to diagnose disease / injury, assess a patient’s response to treatment, and is the preferred method for visualizing soft tissues and organs. MRI scans are used for brain damage, cancer, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord damage, eye problems, inner ear problems, joint damage, bone infections, neck pain, lower back pain and for suspected damage to the liver, pancreas or kidneys. Quick access to MRI is essential for patients with suspected stroke, and EPH performs an average of 5 to 6 MRIs per day.

Estes Park Health is the only MRI provider in the Estes Valley, and her current MRI machine is 14 years old, nearing the end of its life and needs to be replaced. Estes Park Health Foundation is raising money to help fund a new machine, which costs $ 1.1 million.

The advantages of the new MRI machine include:

· Shorter analysis times; examination time reduced by 50%

Diagnostically superior images

Better patient comfort with 4 inches more space in the machine

Adjustable examination coil for exceptional patient positioning

Prostate exams without the use of a rectal coil

Quiet Suite technology will reduce noise during the exam

Are you going to help? Visit www.GivetoEPH.org/MRI to donate.

The Estes Park Health Foundation educates the community about Estes Park Health and develops, manages and distributes funds to help EPH fulfill its mission. To learn more about our initiatives or to volunteer, contact us at GiveToEPH.org or 970-577-4370.

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