eye drops – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 12:19:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://web-xpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-150x150.png eye drops – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ 32 32 Aerie Pharmaceuticals Appoints Peter Lang as Chief Financial Officer | Nation/World https://web-xpress.com/aerie-pharmaceuticals-appoints-peter-lang-as-chief-financial-officer-nation-world/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 11:02:07 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/aerie-pharmaceuticals-appoints-peter-lang-as-chief-financial-officer-nation-world/ DURHAM, NC–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 18, 2022– Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: AERI), a pharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of advanced ophthalmic therapies, today announced that Peter F. Lang will join the company as Chief Financial Officer, effective effective March 18, 2022. He will report to Raj Kannan, Chief Executive Officer of Aerie Pharmaceuticals […]]]>

DURHAM, NC–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 18, 2022–

Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: AERI), a pharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of advanced ophthalmic therapies, today announced that Peter F. Lang will join the company as Chief Financial Officer, effective effective March 18, 2022. He will report to Raj Kannan, Chief Executive Officer of Aerie Pharmaceuticals and become a member of Aerie’s Executive Committee.

“I am delighted to welcome Peter to our leadership team,” said Raj Kannan, President and CEO. “His extensive experience in investment banking and helping life science companies raise, manage and deploy capital, including business development and M&A transactions, will be important in maximizing shareholder value. I am confident that Peter will provide strong leadership and be a great addition to the Aerie team.

Peter Lang added: “I have spent my career working with life sciences companies to help them optimize their growth objectives, funding strategy, capital structure and return on capital, so that they can successfully advance their business plan and meet the needs of patients. I am very excited to join Aerie at this exciting time, with a growing glaucoma business franchise, a strong and innovative pipeline and an experienced team. I look forward to working with Raj and the management team to sustainably grow the business and bring significant value to patients, clinicians and investors.

Peter comes to Aerie with over 25 years of experience providing financial, strategic and operational solutions, with deep expertise in healthcare and a particular focus on the biopharmaceutical sector. He has held senior positions in recognized global and specialty investment banks. Additionally, he has extensive experience working with management teams and boards to optimize business growth plans, capital structures and return on capital. During his career, he has helped raise approximately $105 billion in financing and growth capital and advised on more than 40 M&A and business development transactions totaling over $25 billion in value.

Peter joins Aerie from Ridge Advisory, LLC, where he was Managing Director and Partner. Prior to working at Ridge Advisory, Peter held various senior positions in the healthcare investment banking divisions of well-regarded firms including HSBC, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, UBS Investment Bank and Leerink Partners. Peter holds an MBA from the University of Chicago, Booth School of Business, with Top honors. Peter graduated with a double degree, Magna Cum Laude, from the Wharton School of Business and the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.

About Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Aerie is a pharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of first-in-class ophthalmic therapies for the treatment of patients with ocular diseases and conditions, including open-angle glaucoma, dry eye, macular edema diabetic (OMD) and wet age. associated macular degeneration (wet AMD). Aerie’s first innovative product, Rhopressa ® (netarsudil ophthalmic solution) 0.02%, a once-daily eye drops approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the reduction of intraocular pressure ( elevated IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension, was launched in the United States in April 2018. In clinical trials of Rhopressa®, the most common adverse reactions were conjunctival hyperemia, corneal whorls , pain at the instillation site and conjunctival hemorrhage. More information about Rhopressa ®, including the product label, is available at www.rhopressa.com. Aerie’s second new product for the reduction of elevated IOP in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension, Rocklatan® (netarsudil (0.02%) and latanoprost ophthalmic solution (0.005%)), was launched in the United States in May 2019. In clinical trials of Rocklatan ®, the most common adverse reactions were conjunctival hyperemia, corneal whorls, instillation site pain, and conjunctival hemorrhage. More information about Rocklatan ®, including the product label, is available at www.rocklatan.com. For more information about Aerie Pharmaceuticals, visit www.aeriepharma.com.

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. We may, in certain circumstances, use terms such as “predicted”, “believes”, “potential”, “propose”. , “”continues”, “estimates”, “anticipates”, “expects”, “plans”, “intends”, “may”, “could”, “could”, “will”, ” should”, “explore”, “pursue” or other words that convey uncertainty of future events or results to identify these forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements in this release include statements about our intentions, beliefs, our current projections, outlook, analysis or expectations regarding, among other things, our business franchise and pipeline. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties as they relate to events, competitive dynamics , industry developments and other factors beyond our control, and are dependent on regulatory approvals and economic and environmental circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. longer or shorter than expected. We discuss many of these risks in more detail under the heading “Risk Factors” in our quarterly and annual reports that we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. Any forward-looking statements we make in this press release speak only as of the date of this press release. We undertake no obligation to update our forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, after the date of this press release.

Show source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220318005084/en/

CONTACT: Media:

Caroline McAuliffe

cmcauliffe@aeriepharma.com

(949) 526-8733Investors:

LifeSci Advisors on behalf of Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Hans Vitzthum

hans@lifesciaadvisors.com

(617) 430-7578

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA NORTH CAROLINA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: PHARMACEUTICAL OPTICAL HEALTH OTHER HEALTH

SOURCE: Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 03/18/2022 07:00 / DISK: 03/18/2022 07:02

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220318005084/en

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Blurred vision after surgery: causes, recovery, etc. https://web-xpress.com/blurred-vision-after-surgery-causes-recovery-etc/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 23:53:08 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/blurred-vision-after-surgery-causes-recovery-etc/ Blurred vision can be a common side effect of eye surgeries. In fact, any operation on or around your eyes can cause temporary vision changes, including blurred vision. Other potential vision problems depend on the type of surgery you had, as well as the type of anesthesia used. Cataract surgery Cataracts are caused by proteins […]]]>

Blurred vision can be a common side effect of eye surgeries. In fact, any operation on or around your eyes can cause temporary vision changes, including blurred vision.

Other potential vision problems depend on the type of surgery you had, as well as the type of anesthesia used.

Cataract surgery

Cataracts are caused by proteins that can change or break down inside your eye. When this happens, the proteins can clump together and form whitish, yellow or brown clumps that cover the natural lens of your eye. These clumps impair your vision by making things blurry or hazy.

Cataracts take years to develop and are more common in older people.

Cataract surgery usually takes place in an operating room. It is generally a quick and safe procedure with a high success rate.

You will usually receive local anesthesia during cataract surgery. This numbs the nerves around your eye so you won’t feel any pain or discomfort.

During the procedure, a doctor will remove the cloudy natural lens from your eye. They will replace it with a transparent artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens.

Blurred vision is common immediately after cataract surgery. It usually disappears in 2 to 3 days. In some cases, however, it may take a week or more for the blurred vision to go away.

In addition to blurry vision, it is not uncommon to experience some sensitivity to light immediately after surgery. More serious complications are rare.

Vitrectomy

A vitrectomy is eye surgery that removes the vitreous humor from your eye. This is a gel-like substance that fills the back chamber of your eye.

You may need to remove the vitreous if you have problems with your retina. The retina is a collection of cells at the back of your eye that sends visual signals to your brain to help it interpret images.

A vitrectomy is done in an operating room. You will usually receive a longer-acting local anesthetic around your eye.

After a surgeon removes the vitreous, they replace it with a saline solution or bubble. Over time, your body will produce more natural fluid, refilling the eye socket.

If there are no complications, most people leave the hospital within hours of having a vitrectomy.

Blurred vision after vitrectomy is possible and can last 2-3 days. However, blurred vision may last longer if you have both vitrectomy and retinal surgery.

After the procedure, some people also experience a gritty or scratchy sensation in their eyes. Both issues should disappear within a few days. The surgeon may prescribe eye drops to help with healing.

Eyelid surgery

Blepharoplasty is an eyelid surgery that corrects droopy eyelids.

Typically, you will receive local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia. This means that recovery after eyelid surgery is relatively quick.

During this procedure, a surgeon will remove fat, muscle, or excess skin from your eyelid. They will then stitch up the eyelid to prevent it from falling.

You will likely go home a few hours after surgery. However, short-term side effects like blurred vision and light sensitivity are possible. These usually disappear within a few days.

LASIK or PRK surgery

Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is a common eye surgery used to treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.

As with many eye surgeries, local anesthesia is commonly used and you can go home within hours.

During the operation, a surgeon will use lasers and small blades to reshape the cornea of ​​your eye. This will allow your eyes to properly focus the light and should result in better vision. It generally eliminates the need for corrective lenses like glasses or contacts.

Some people may experience a gritty or sandy texture in their eyes after surgery. Dry eye, which can cause blurred vision, is also quite common after LASIK surgery.

Blurry vision can last for several days, but usually goes away on its own. You will need antibiotic and steroid eye drops for proper healing. Eye drops can also help lubricate your eyes as they heal.

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) laser surgery is an older procedure similar to LASIK. It is also used to help correct vision by reshaping corneal tissue.

With PRK, a surgeon will completely remove the top layer of corneal tissue. They will then use a laser to reshape the irregular corneal tissue.

Recovery is similar to LASIK, but blurred vision may last longer as the surface of the eye continues to heal.

Retinal detachment surgery

If your retina detaches from the tissues of your eye, you may experience immediate vision problems, including:

  • Blurred vision
  • partial vision loss
  • sudden flashes of light in your field of vision

Retinal detachment is a medical emergency. It must be treated quickly to help reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Surgery can repair a detached retina. Most often, this surgery can be performed under local anesthesia injected around the eye.

Recovery, however, may take longer. You will likely experience short-term side effects like watery eyes and blurred vision for several days after surgery. Regular vision may not return for 2 to 4 weeks.

Some people may need additional surgeries to completely correct vision problems after retinal detachment.

Cornea transplant

Corneal transplantation, or keratoplasty, is necessary if the cornea of ​​your eye is damaged or diseased. During this operation, a surgeon will replace the cornea with donated corneal tissue. Once healed, the new tissue should restore vision.

Recovering from a corneal transplant can take several months. Most short-term side effects, including blurred vision, can last a few weeks or longer.

A doctor may ask you to wear a face shield or eye protection for several days to help the tissues heal. Once removed, side effects like blurred vision may occur as your eyes readjust.

Your doctor will likely prescribe medicated eye drops to help reduce side effects. Glasses and contact lenses may be needed for long-term clear vision.

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Sodium Hyaluronate Eye Drops Market Size, Competitor Strategy, Regional Analysis & Industry Growth By Forecast To 2028 – The Bollywood Ticket https://web-xpress.com/sodium-hyaluronate-eye-drops-market-size-competitor-strategy-regional-analysis-industry-growth-by-forecast-to-2028-the-bollywood-ticket/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 14:39:39 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/sodium-hyaluronate-eye-drops-market-size-competitor-strategy-regional-analysis-industry-growth-by-forecast-to-2028-the-bollywood-ticket/ Reports and Data has released a new report on Sodium Hyaluronate Eye Drops Market which offers a comprehensive overview of the market and helps investors and users understand market dynamics and make investment plans accordingly. The report provides details about market revenue growth, market size, drivers, restraints, limitations, growth opportunities, and top companies. The report […]]]>

Reports and Data has released a new report on Sodium Hyaluronate Eye Drops Market which offers a comprehensive overview of the market and helps investors and users understand market dynamics and make investment plans accordingly. The report provides details about market revenue growth, market size, drivers, restraints, limitations, growth opportunities, and top companies. The report also focuses on manufacturing and production and recent collaborations of market players. The report is formulated from extensive primary and secondary research and verified by industry experts and professionals. Data is well represented by charts, graphs, tables, figures and other pictorial presentations.

Get a sample report @ https://www.reportsanddata.com/sample-enquiry-form/428

Market Overview:

The global sodium hyaluronate eye drops market has grown significantly over the past few years and is expected to witness rapid growth during the forecast period of 2021 to 2028. The pharmaceutical and healthcare industry is rapidly changing with technological innovations, increased health expenditure and improved health facilities. and systems. Many hospitals, outpatient surgical centers and clinics around the world are adopting state-of-the-art devices and equipment. The revenue growth of the global sodium hyaluronate eye drops market is largely driven by factors such as rising prevalence of chronic diseases, rapid advancements in healthcare and medical sectors, high adoption of the latest tools and techniques and the growth of funds by several public and private sectors. In addition, increasing attention to drug development, increasing demand for precision medicine, high adoption of home care settings and point-of-care diagnostics, increasing investment in research activities and development are expected to drive the revenue growth of the global market over the forecast period.

The ongoing pandemic is significantly changing the dynamics of the pharmaceutical and healthcare sector. Various countries are facing challenges such as shortage of medicines, vaccines, health devices in hospitals. This is expected to open up lucrative growth opportunities for market players in the coming years.

Key Companies Featured in the Report:

  • Alcon
  • Altacor
  • Bausch & Lomb
  • Bayer, Inc.
  • Cigna
  • Bright Eyes
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Novax Pharma
  • optrex
  • Refresh
  • Ritual Aid
  • Healthn
  • Scope Ophthalmics Ltd.
  • Similasan Company
  • Staples
  • Systane
  • United Laboratories
  • Thea Pharmaceuticals
  • URSAPHARM Arzneimittel GmbH
  • View
  • Viva Opti-free
  • Walgreens
  • Xiuzheng Pharmaceutical Group

To learn more about the report, visit @ https://www.reportsanddata.com/report-detail/sodium-hyaluronate-eye-drops-market

Competitive Landscape:

The global market comprises various market players operating at regional and global levels. These key players are adopting various strategies such as R&D investments, licensing agreements, partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, collaborations and joint ventures to gain a strong foothold in the market.

Sodium Hyaluronate Eye Drops Market Segmentation:

Treatment Type Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2018-2028)

  • dry eye disease
  • Sjogren’s Syndrome
  • Stevens Johnson Syndrome
  • Conjunctival
  • Corneal epithelial lesions

Distribution Channel Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2018-2028)

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Regional outlook of the global sodium hyaluronate eye drops market

  • North America
  • Europe
    • K
    • Germany
    • France
    • Italy
    • Spain
  • Asia Pacific
    • India
    • China
    • Japan
    • Australia
    • Rest of Asia-Pacific
  • Latin America
    • Brazil
    • Argentina
    • Peru
    • Mexico
    • Rest of Latin America
  • Middle East and Africa
    • Saudi Arabia
    • South Africa
    • EA
    • Rest of the Middle East and Africa

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World Glaucoma Day 2022: Everything you need to know about the ‘silent thief of sight’ https://web-xpress.com/world-glaucoma-day-2022-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-silent-thief-of-sight/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 03:40:44 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/world-glaucoma-day-2022-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-silent-thief-of-sight/ Have you ever felt pressure in your eyes which in turn causes severe headaches and red eyes? Or have you experienced rainbow-colored halos when looking at an object or feeling nauseous? These could be signs of glaucoma, the second most common cause of preventable blindness worldwide. “It is a disease that damages the optic nerve […]]]>

Have you ever felt pressure in your eyes which in turn causes severe headaches and red eyes? Or have you experienced rainbow-colored halos when looking at an object or feeling nauseous? These could be signs of glaucoma, the second most common cause of preventable blindness worldwide. “It is a disease that damages the optic nerve of the the eyes, a nerve that connects to the brain, allowing us to see. It may be related to increased pressure in the eye known as intraocular pressure,” said Dr. Neha Chaturvedi, Consultant Ophthalmologist, ASG Eye Hospital Private Limited, Bhopal. Every year, March 12 is celebrated as World Glaucoma Day. Here’s what to know about the condition that’s also known as the “silent thief of sight.”

Experts added that the prevalence of the disease increases with age and people over 40 are more susceptible. “It is estimated that in India there are about 11 million glaucoma patients over the age of 40. Although glaucoma is more common in older people, there are also types that belong to different age groups. The disease present in newborns is called “congenital glaucoma”, in young people (3-10 years old) it is called “developmental glaucoma” and “juvenile glaucoma” is called the group between 10 and 40 years old. ,” she continued.

It is estimated that in India there are around 11 million glaucoma patients over the age of 40 (Source: Getty Images/Thinkstock)

Like various other diseases, even glaucoma can be hereditary. Trauma to the head or eye area, prolonged use of steroids in the form of eye drops or oral medications for an unsupervised period of time can also cause this eye disease. There are usually no warning signs of glaucoma; it is a progressive condition resulting in progressive deterioration of vision. “Therefore, it is also called the ‘silent thief of sight.’ Since vision loss in glaucoma is irreversible, a routine screening examination at the ophthalmologist is essential for people with high risk factors.Routine screening includes examining the structure of the optic nerve, checking pressure and, if necessary, a few tests are suggested to assess the nerve.These include visual field tests, corneal thickness and OCT scans of the optic nerve.These tests not only help confirm the diagnosis of glaucoma, but also to quantify the damage of the disease and to effective management,” she explained.

Because the anatomical structure of each eye is different, there are two main types of glaucoma: open-angle glaucoma (OAG), which has a slow and asymptomatic onset, and angle-closure glaucoma (ACG), which causes an acute increase eye pressure.

Although there is currently no cure available for glaucoma, the eye disorder can be managed through various therapies to prevent further loss of vision and field in the patient. There are different options for lowering the eye pressure at the desired level. In its early stages, the disease can be controlled by prescribing eye drops to be used regularly. However, for cases that do not respond to medical treatment, eye surgery is an option that can slow or stop the progression of the disease. Surgeries like standard filter surgery with the use of an ologen implant, valve surgery, minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS), laser surgery are the various treatment options that can be explored with the doctor.

Successfully treating glaucoma is a team effort between patient and doctor. After prescribing a desired treatment, an ophthalmologist will lay down certain instructions that should be followed consistently. “Regular screening, annual or semi-annual comprehensive eye exams, maintaining a healthy body weight by eating a balanced diet rich in antioxidant foods, controlling diabetes, preventing high caffeine intake and smoking are some of the remedies precaution to help combat the disorder. In addition, one should also avoid head-down postures in some forms of exercise and sudden sips of large amounts of water which can cause an increase in eye pressure,” she said.

Yearly screening, regular checkup with the eye doctor, taking the prescribed medication for life, are some of the ways to manage the eye disorder and prevent vision loss. Following these key elements will help the patient lead a healthy life. In addition, awareness is the key to controlling glaucoma.

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Can diet have an impact on dry eyes? https://web-xpress.com/can-diet-have-an-impact-on-dry-eyes/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 22:25:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/can-diet-have-an-impact-on-dry-eyes/ LANSING, Mich. (WILX) — Dry eye syndrome is a chronic condition in which your body doesn’t produce enough tears or the tears don’t lubricate your eyes enough. Related: Your health: New treatment relieves dry eyes It affects approximately 16 million people in the United States. New research suggests that your diet may improve symptoms. If […]]]>

LANSING, Mich. (WILX) — Dry eye syndrome is a chronic condition in which your body doesn’t produce enough tears or the tears don’t lubricate your eyes enough.

Related: Your health: New treatment relieves dry eyes

It affects approximately 16 million people in the United States. New research suggests that your diet may improve symptoms.

If your eyes are constantly irritated, itchy, red, or painful, you may have dry eye syndrome. Eye drops are a treatment option, but what you eat can also help or hurt your eyes.

“There’s definitely a correlation between a poor inflammatory diet and worsening dry eye, so things that are inflammatory. So dairy products are inflammatory. Meats are inflammatory. Eggs are inflammatory,” Dr. Rolando Toyos, from the Toyos clinic.

Toyos said people should avoid processed foods as much as possible. What should you eat? Omega-3 fatty acids – found in fish like trout, salmon, sardines and mackerel – can reduce inflammation and dry eye symptoms.

“If they don’t eat fish, we’ll start them on an omega-3 supplement,” Toyos said.

Vitamin C has also been shown to protect the eyes from pollution and improve tear production. It is abundant in broccoli, Brussels sprouts and citrus fruits.

Vitamin E – found in sunflower oil, almonds, pumpkin and spinach – helps protect the retina from injury and helps maintain the tear film layer in the eye.

Vitamin A, found in carrots, squash, and tuna, may also help reduce dry eye symptoms and improve tear quality. New research shows that the caffeine in beverages like coffee, black tea, and green tea can stimulate tear production.

Studies also show that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to worsening dry eye symptoms. The best way to get vitamin D is to spend 10-15 minutes in the sun every day.

Continued: Health Stories

Copyright 2022 WILX. All rights reserved.

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Eye provides clues to insidious vascular disease https://web-xpress.com/eye-provides-clues-to-insidious-vascular-disease/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 02:02:31 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/eye-provides-clues-to-insidious-vascular-disease/ image: When vessels are photographed through the lens of the eye, neural networks can detect certain diseases based on the images. see Following Credit: Mueller, S. and Wintergerst, MWM et al. Multi-instance learning detects peripheral arterial disease from high-resolution color fundus photography. Sci Rep 12, 1389 (2022) Researchers from the University and University Hospital of […]]]>

image: When vessels are photographed through the lens of the eye, neural networks can detect certain diseases based on the images.
see Following

Credit: Mueller, S. and Wintergerst, MWM et al. Multi-instance learning detects peripheral arterial disease from high-resolution color fundus photography. Sci Rep 12, 1389 (2022)

Researchers from the University and University Hospital of Bonn have developed a method that could be used to diagnose atherosclerosis. Using self-learning software, they were able to identify vascular changes in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), often at an early stage. Although these early stages do not yet cause symptoms, they are nevertheless already associated with increased mortality. The algorithm used photos of an organ not normally associated with PAD: the eye. The results have just been published in the journal Scientific reports.

Poets regard the eyes as a window to the soul. But more prosaically, we could also call them windows on our ships. The fundus is very well irrigated. It’s necessary for the more than 100 million photoreceptors in the retina and the nerve cells connected to them to do their job. At the same time, arteries and veins can be observed and photographed through the pupil without much effort.

It may be possible to detect the first signs of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) with such an examination in the future. In this case, chronic remodeling processes lead to narrowing of the vessels and hardening of the affected arteries. It is the leading cause of heart attacks and strokes, the most common causes of death in Western industrialized countries, as well as peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

More than four million people in this country suffer from PAD. “As it usually causes no symptoms in the first few years, the diagnosis is often only made when secondary damage has already occurred,” explains Dr. Nadjib Schahab, head of the angiology section and one of the authors of the study. ‘study. “The consequences can be dramatic. In the long term, progressive circulatory problems in the legs and arms can even lead to amputation. In addition, the risk of a fatal heart attack or stroke is greatly increased – even in the early stages of the disease.

Early diagnosis is therefore very important in order to be able to treat those affected in time. The interdisciplinary project of the Department of Informatics at the University of Bonn and the Department of Ophthalmology and Heart Center at the University Hospital Bonn begins exactly there. “We photographed 97 eyes of women and men who suffered from PAD,” says Dr. Maximilian Wintergerst of the University Eye Hospital Bonn. “In more than half of them, the disease was still at a stage where it caused no symptoms.” Additionally, the team took background images of 34 eyes of healthy control subjects.

Neural network detects early vascular changes

They then used the images to feed a convolutional neural network (CNN). It is a software that is inspired by the human brain in its operation. If such a CNN is formed with photos whose content is known to the computer, it can later recognize the content of unknown photos. However, for this to work with sufficient certainty, it normally takes several tens of thousands of training photos – far more than was available in the study.

“We therefore first carried out a pre-training with another disease that attacks the eye vessels,” explains Professor Dr. Thomas Schultz of the International Center for Information Technology Bonn-Aachen (b-it ) and the Institute of Computer Science. II at the University of Bonn. To do this, the researchers used a dataset of more than 80,000 additional photos. “In a sense, the algorithm learns from them what to pay particular attention to,” explains Schultz, who is also a member of the transdisciplinary research areas “Modeling” and “Life and Health” at the University of Bonn. “So we’re also talking about transfer learning.”

The CNN trained in this way was able to diagnose with remarkable accuracy whether the pictures of the eyes were from a PAD patient or a healthy person. “A good 80% of all affected individuals were correctly identified, if we considered 20% false positives, i.e. healthy individuals that the algorithm incorrectly classified as sick,” Schultz explains. “It’s amazing because even for trained ophthalmologists, PAD cannot be detected from fundus images.”

In further analyses, the researchers were able to show that the neural network pays particular attention to the large vessels at the back of the eye when evaluating it. However, to obtain the best possible result, the method required digital images with a sufficiently high resolution. “A lot of CNNs work with very low-resolution photos,” Schultz says. “This is sufficient to detect major changes. For our PAD classification, on the other hand, we need a resolution at which details of vascular structures remain discernible.”

The researchers hope to further improve the performance of their method in the future. To do this, they plan to cooperate with ophthalmology and vascular medicine centers around the world who will provide them with additional fundus images of those affected. The long-term goal is to develop a simple, rapid and reliable diagnostic method that does not require concomitant procedures such as the administration of eye drops.

Participating establishments:

The B-IT and the Institute for Informatics II of the University of Bonn, the University Eye Hospital Bonn and the Clinic for Cardiology and Angiology of the University Hospital Bonn participated in the study.

Publication: Mueller, S., Wintergerst, MWM, Falahat, P. et al. Multi-instance learning detects peripheral arterial disease from high-resolution color fundus photography. Sci Rep 12, 1389 (2022).
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-05169-z

Contact:

Teacher. Dr. Thomas Schultz
Bonn-Aachen International Center for Information Technology (B-IT) and Institute for Computer Science II at the University of Bonn
Phone +49-228-7369140
Email: schultz@cs.uni-bonn.de

Dr. Maximilian WM Wintergerst
Bonn University Eye Hospital
Phone +49-228-28715505
Email: Maximilian.Wintergerst@ukbonn.de

Priv.-Doz. Dr. Nadjib Shahab
Head of Angiology Section
Bonn University Hospital Cardiac Center
Phone +49-228-28712703
Email: nadjib.schahab@ukbonn.de


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Pterygia, a common underdiagnosed eye condition, targeting Houstonians, especially the Hispanic community https://web-xpress.com/pterygia-a-common-underdiagnosed-eye-condition-targeting-houstonians-especially-the-hispanic-community/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 03:54:44 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/pterygia-a-common-underdiagnosed-eye-condition-targeting-houstonians-especially-the-hispanic-community/ HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Do you suffer from itchy, red or dry eyes? It may be a common but often underrecognized eye condition called pterygia. ABC13 anchor Rita Garcia shares her own personal struggle with the condition and why the Hispanic community, in particular, should pay attention to the issue. Ophthalmologists say the Houston area […]]]>
HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Do you suffer from itchy, red or dry eyes? It may be a common but often underrecognized eye condition called pterygia. ABC13 anchor Rita Garcia shares her own personal struggle with the condition and why the Hispanic community, in particular, should pay attention to the issue.

Ophthalmologists say the Houston area is part of what’s called the “pterygium belt.” This means that we are more exposed to UV rays from the sun than in other parts of the country.

ABC13 spoke with Tracey Kelly, who recently had pterygium removal surgery in August.

“I actually grew up on the beach in Florida. I had a fun childhood, but I paid for it years later,” Kelly said.

Kelly said she paid for it because of the environment she grew up in along the coast, and it’s the same in Houston. Doctors have said that pterygia is caused by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun and unfortunately as the disease progresses it can become a nuisance.

For Kelly, that’s exactly how she would describe her experience.

“It seemed like I was crying all the time. They were always irritated and red and itchy. People were always asking me, ‘What’s wrong? Why are you crying? Are you okay?’

Kelly’s ophthalmologist, Dr Justus Thomas, said the condition is common and is often confused with chronic dry eye.

“I think there’s a real opportunity for public awareness,” Dr. Thomas said.

He said if the growth progresses too far, it can actually damage your vision.

When spotted early, Dr Thomas said he would usually recommend simple treatments like prescription eye drops, wearing a hat outside, using polarized sunglasses to reduce any glare (especially in water) and turning off your ceiling fan while you sleep.

By the time the patients are in his office, it’s probably time for surgery. Dr. Thomas also mentioned that although Houston is so diverse and treats patients of all ethnicities, research shows that globally these pterygiums or growths are more prevalent among Hispanics.

“It is unclear if this is a genetic phenomenon or if it is because we have a higher proportion of these patients living in the pterygium belt. It may also have to do with the question of whether whether there might be a higher proportion of these patients in occupations that expose them to more sunlight,” he said.

According to the National Library of Medicine, a recent study of fewer than 5,000 Hispanics found that men had a higher rate than women, 23.7% versus 11.5%, respectively, of developing pterygiums. Low income and low education were also associated with a high risk of pterygium. However, Dr. Thomas said, we are not born with these growths and need more research into the role genetics might play.

For Rita, having this information would also answer a lot of her questions, as it is something that is seen in her family.

“A few years ago I had surgery to remove the pterygium in both my eyes. But for years I suffered with my eyes always inflamed, appearing red and most often it was painful” , said Rita. “Just like Kelly described it, for years I too was aware of what it looked like and thought people were still watching.”

It has been a journey for Rita and Kelly to find relief.

Dr Thomas said a pterygium can now be successfully removed and is also less likely to grow back. He said recovery time will vary, but in Kelly’s case it was only a few days and now she has a whole new vision of what her life will ultimately look like post-surgery.

Copyright © 2022 KTRK-TV. All rights reserved.

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Cowra’s Business Faces: Rob Webster | Keeper Cowra https://web-xpress.com/cowras-business-faces-rob-webster-keeper-cowra/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/cowras-business-faces-rob-webster-keeper-cowra/ Since 1960, Webster optometristsThe name is well known throughout Cowra and the district and has helped generations of local residents. As part of our ongoing series, the Keeper Cowra talked to well-known optometrist Rob Webster about following in his father’s footsteps. Tell us a bit about yourself and how long have you been an optometrist? […]]]>

Since 1960, Webster optometristsThe name is well known throughout Cowra and the district and has helped generations of local residents.

As part of our ongoing series, the Keeper Cowra talked to well-known optometrist Rob Webster about following in his father’s footsteps.

Tell us a bit about yourself and how long have you been an optometrist?

I was born in Cowra in 1970 and joined my dad here in 1994 and graduated from the University of NSW in 1992 so quite a few years.

What made you want to become an optometrist?

I was very lucky to have the opportunity to work in the family business.

I naturally turned to health care and optometry seemed like a good choice.

What does a typical day look like?

There is the eye health examination and the prescription of glasses and contact lenses, that’s the main thing.

But I’m more and more assessing whether people are fit to drive because that’s become an increasingly important part of our responsibilities, that kind of testing.

And also over the past 30 years, not only to detect eye disease, but we’ve gotten the right to prescribe a broader list of drugs – eye drops to treat things like glaucoma, dry eye.

I also work very closely with our closest ophthalmologists in Orange and Bathurst.

Dr Basil Crayford comes and we are lucky that he has cataract surgery once a month at Cowra.

Do you have any advice for those considering a career in optometry?

It’s a great advantage, it’s bloodless and there are no afternoons in the normal course of things.

But I fear for them how hard it is to get in, it’s more competitive in terms of numbers than in my time.

Remember there are more universities offering it now.

There were three in my day, I think there are six now.

It’s also a good way to meet a wide range of your local community.

This is all about solving problems and reassuring that there is nothing wrong in their eyes.

Especially when they get older and know someone in the family or a friend who has lost their sight.

But fortunately, even in just 30 years, we can do a lot more for things like macular degeneration.

It’s not as unpleasant a diagnosis as before.

Is there anything people could do to take better care of their eye health?

Apart from giving up cigarettes, but a balanced diet.

It is difficult to draw a direct link between general health and eye health, but diabetes has an alarming rate of young people with serious vision-threatening additions because of it.

Certainly, diabetes seems to be linked to processed foods and our lower dietary standards.

What is it about you that people may not know?

In fact, I like to score in cricket.

I have always enjoyed my participation in junior Cowra cricket.

My son is a bit too old for that at 17, he still plays junior cricket but not Cowra.

Anything else people should know about the life of an optometrist?

One thing about the country in its favor is that you are required to familiarize yourself with a much wider range of illnesses and conditions.

Because you don’t have the number of specialists on hand that you get in city practices.

You have to become a jack-of-all-trades like general practitioners.

What do you think?

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The review took me straight to A&E but the amazing NHS was there for me https://web-xpress.com/the-review-took-me-straight-to-ae-but-the-amazing-nhs-was-there-for-me/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 08:44:43 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/the-review-took-me-straight-to-ae-but-the-amazing-nhs-was-there-for-me/ [ad_1] An ECHO reporter has spoken of the frightening moment he was told to go straight to A&E after having his eye examined – and the incredible care he received from the NHS. Political editor Liam Thorp had suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in his right eye “for weeks” before going to the […]]]>


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An ECHO reporter has spoken of the frightening moment he was told to go straight to A&E after having his eye examined – and the incredible care he received from the NHS.

Political editor Liam Thorp had suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in his right eye “for weeks” before going to the optician.

After further inspection, the 33-year-old was asked to go straight to the hospital where he was diagnosed with retinal detachment.

READ MORE:Mersey Tunnel toll prices set to rise for the first time in five years

Here our political editor pays tribute to the incredible work of our NHS heroes and why we must protect him at all costs.

In an article written in 2015, Dr Neil Shastri-Hurst, the recently defeated Conservative Party candidate in the North Shropshire by-elections, asked if it was “really worth fighting for the NHS”.

Dr Shastri-Hurst, who lost to the Lib Dems after a historic departure from his party last month, wrote that “health rationing has always happened, but maybe it is time to be more frank and honest on what we can realistically afford in a public system ”.

He is not the only one to have put forward such ideas. There are a number of voices who like to periodically question the future of our free national point-of-use health service.

I have always been passionate about the NHS and believe that supporting and protecting this unique and remarkable institution is of the utmost importance to our society.

Fortunately for me, until now this passion has not come from real personal experience.

At the age of 33, I was fortunate enough to avoid any major health problems or the need for serious surgery or treatment.

Well, that was the case until about a month ago.

Having suffered from severe headaches and blurred vision in my right eye for a few weeks, I went to the optician, naively believing that my problems would be quickly resolved with a new prescription for glasses or perhaps eye drops. the eyes.

Sadly, the expression of concern I saw etched on the optician’s face told a different story and he told me to rush to the hospital.

We are extremely fortunate here in Liverpool to have access to the world famous St Paul’s Eye Hospital, which is attached to the Royal Liverpool Hospital.

It is a highly respected specialist facility that people travel to from far and wide for all kinds of eye problems.

The situation in my right eye – which included dangerously high pressure – meant that upon arriving at St Paul’s that afternoon, I was immediately seen and quickly diagnosed with retinal detachment.



Liam Thorp after undergoing retinal detachment surgery

It’s a problem that occurs when the retina – a crucial part of the eye that sends visual images to the brain – is moved away from its normal position.

It is a very serious problem which is likely to cause blindness without urgent treatment and I have been told that I will need emergency surgery in a few days.

It was a real shock and something that took a long time to process. I had initially hoped to go to work after my hospital visit – but the reality of the situation meant I wouldn’t be back at my desk for weeks.

But that initial shock – and the emotions that naturally followed – have been tempered by an overwhelming sense of gratitude to those who are doing all they can to make things better.

This included the first nurse I met in the ER, Melissa, who managed to let me know that there were serious concerns about the situation with my eyes, all the while making me laugh and feel awkward. ease – a Scouse specialist skill.

Or Dr Ken, a surgeon from Malaysia via New Zealand – who would be part of the operating team later in the week. He calmly explained to me what had happened and what he and his team would do to fix it.

The combination of kindness, care, skill and expertise was amazing and kept me relatively comfortable during what has been quite a disturbing time in my life.

I was raised in the love and admiration of our National Health Service and now, for the first time in my personal experience, I was discovering exactly why this is such a unique and vital institution that we are so fortunate to have. ‘have access.

The following days were a bit hazy (metaphorically and literally) of return visits to St Paul for preoperative analysis and discussion and this crucial combination of kindness and expertise was reflected in every member of staff at the NHS I have been in contact with. with.

The surgery came later in the week and although I was a little anxious to be woken up for the operation with only a local anesthetic in place, I couldn’t help but be impressed as I listened. the surgeons discuss the complexity of the work they were doing on my eye.

A nurse sat next to me and held my hand throughout the operation. A simple act of kindness and compassion that was hugely appreciated as I tried to keep my cool.

I have also been impressed by the medical advancements which mean that such delicate and skillful surgery is now relatively common for the NHS.

In his memoirs, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown speaks of undergoing an then experimental retinal detachment operation in 1971.

Brown had previously lost his sight in his left eye after a rugby injury and was at risk of going completely blind from a detachment from the other – without the efforts of an Indian surgeon called Dr Hector Chawla, who had performed research on such treatments. .

As Brown writes, it was in part thanks to Dr. Chawla’s breakthroughs that the success rate for retinal reattachment rose from 20% to 90% in the 40 years after his own surgery.

As for my own operation, I was told it was a success and that my retina had been reattached, which was a huge relief to hear.

I am now in a period of waiting and hoping that the sight in my right eye will improve – it remains quite blurry and could take a few weeks before I know how things will turn out in the longer term, but progress are on track.



Echo political editor Liam Thorp underwent emergency surgery for retinal detachment in his eye
Echo political editor Liam Thorp underwent emergency surgery for retinal detachment in his eye

I am in regular contact with the brilliant team at St Paul’s who continue to guide me through this troubling time, I am eternally grateful to them.

A thought that often crossed my mind in the weeks following my sudden diagnosis and surgery is how much more difficult this situation would have been if I had received a big financial bill immediately after,

This would be the case for patients in many other countries – and while our politicians publicly promise to keep health care free, recent changes in policy and storytelling suggest we should definitely be concerned about the direction of travel.

Over the past two decades, charges have been introduced for secondary care in the NHS for those who are not ‘usual residents’.

The rules have become particularly strict in England in recent years under the government’s “hostile environment” policies.

A recent report by the Institute for Public Policy Research found that the current NHS pricing system requires migrants to pay 150% of the cost of their health care.

The report says the system is a threat to public health care because it deters and delays people from seeking treatment and has been plagued with accusations of racial profiling and poor decision-making – while being very costly to to supply.

When establishing the NHS, Nye Bevan wrote that “no society can legitimately call itself civilized if a sick person is denied medical help for lack of means”. There are genuine fears that this principle is already being sidelined in some aspects of healthcare in this country – and that the worst could be yet to come.

I am fortunate that when things suddenly turned badly for me, I didn’t have to worry about whether showing up for emergency treatment might get me in trouble with the Ministry of Health. ‘Interior – and I’m lucky to live in a country where I didn’t have to think about how I could afford to pay for the surgery I desperately needed.

Our National Health Service is a phenomenal creation, the best example of a company working together to create something that we will all need at some point in time – sometimes when we least expect it.

We must do everything to protect it.

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Stuart Therapeutics, Inc. Announces Successful Results of Phase 2 Clinical Trial of New Dry Eye Candidate ST-100 https://web-xpress.com/stuart-therapeutics-inc-announces-successful-results-of-phase-2-clinical-trial-of-new-dry-eye-candidate-st-100/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 22:46:05 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/stuart-therapeutics-inc-announces-successful-results-of-phase-2-clinical-trial-of-new-dry-eye-candidate-st-100/ [ad_1] STUART, Florida, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Stuart Therapeutics, Inc. (STUART), an innovative clinical-phase ophthalmic therapy development company, today announced the first results of the first phase 2 human clinical trial for its lead drug candidate, ST-100 in patients with dry eye disease. The clinical trial, conducted between June and October 2021, […]]]>


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STUART, Florida, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Stuart Therapeutics, Inc. (STUART), an innovative clinical-phase ophthalmic therapy development company, today announced the first results of the first phase 2 human clinical trial for its lead drug candidate, ST-100 in patients with dry eye disease. The clinical trial, conducted between June and October 2021, was a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to evaluate the acute and chronic efficacy of ST-100 topical eye drops on the signs and symptoms of dry eye. One hundred and sixty patients were included and received twice daily a dose of 20 mg / ml or 50 mg / ml of ST-100, or a placebo.

FDA pre-approved single primary endpoint met after 28 days & Improvement in total eye discomfort after 14 days

ST-100 (50 mg / ml) met a pre-approved primary endpoint, based on recent FDA guidelines, Schirmer’s test response rate (defined as a statistically significant difference between the percentage of patients reaching an increase of 10 mm or more in Schirmer’s tear test scores at 28 days (p = 0.0266). ST-100 also demonstrated significant results in several symptoms and ocular surface staining scores as of the seventh day of treatment in both the intention-to-treat population as well as in the treated patient subpopulations. An overall improvement in ocular discomfort (Ora Calibra scale) was observed on day 14 of treatment (p = 0.0332).

ST-100 was well tolerated and the comfort scores of eye drops compared favorably to artificial tear products. There were no serious drug-related adverse events associated with the trial. The phase 2 trial was conducted by Ora®, Inc., a leading ophthalmic clinical development company.

“It is encouraging that the ST-100 achieved Schirmer’s difficult endpoint of response rate in just 28 days. STUART further studies on the mechanism of action (see below), it has the potential to directly affect the integrity of the neural process of the cornea and conjunctiva, which is believed to be an underlying cause of dry eye, impacting the health of the ocular surface and tear film production. The efficacy and comfort profile of ST-100 suggests the possibility of a revolutionary treatment for dry eye, a debilitating disease that affects more than 700 million patients worldwide, ”said Georges Ousler, first vice-president of Ora. “Ora is honored to partner with Stuart Therapeutics to assess this promising candidate, and we look forward to seeing this therapy move to the next stage in clinical development. “

“The Stuart Therapeutics team is proud to have taken this important step,” said Eric Schlumpf, President and CEO. “The Phase 2 trial gave us a better understanding of the efficacy and tolerability of ST-100 as a topical ophthalmic treatment, and provided us with a wealth of human data to further explore the details of the mechanism of action and the potential of ST-100 and our collagen mimetic platform technology, PolyColMT (PolyCol) in other indications of disease. “

“As a long-time ophthalmologist, I am satisfied with the speed of action, the comfort of the ST-100 formulation and the efficacy results,” said Robert baratta, MD, Chief Medical Officer and President of STUART. “We are delighted with the opportunity to advance the ST-100 into the Phase 3 program.”

About the ST-100

ST-100’s unique mechanism of action (MOA) works by restoring the structural and cellular signaling capacity of helical collagen damaged by disease. Preclinical results demonstrated epithelial restoration and neuronal protection, repair and regeneration in in vitro and in vivo models. Current results from the Phase 2 clinical trial appear to support the neural pathway for tear production and the role of ST-100 in repairing DED-damaged nerve pathways in the conjunctiva and cornea.

On PolyCol

The active ingredient in ST-100 is part of the PolyCol platform of synthesized collagen mimetic peptides. STUART controls the worldwide rights to this patented technology in ophthalmic therapy. The active ingredient in ST-100 is a stable split synthetic single strand of human collagen. It acts as a direct repairer of damaged helical collagen in situ, and is directly applicable when disease or trauma affects important cells and the underlying collagen membranes and extracellular matrix.

About dry eye

An estimated 16 million American adults have been diagnosed with dry eye, a multifactorial condition of the ocular surface of the eye characterized by a rupture of the tear film. A healthy tear film protects and lubricates the eyes, removes foreign particles, contains antimicrobials to reduce the risk of infection, and creates a smooth surface that contributes refractive power for clear vision. Dry eye can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of daily life, as it can cause persistent stinging, scratching, burning sensations, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and eye strain. Despite the high prevalence of dry eye and the burden of disease, there remains a significant unmet need for effective therapies.

About Ora®, Inc.

Ora is the global leader in the development of full-service ophthalmic drugs and devices with offices in United States, UK, Australia, and Asia. For over 40 years, we have proudly helped our customers achieve over 45 product approvals. We support a wide range of organizations, from start-ups to global pharmaceutical and device companies, to effectively bring their new products from concept to market. Ora’s preclinical and clinical models, unique methodologies and global regulatory strategies have been refined and proven in thousands of global projects. We bring together the world’s largest and most experienced team of ophthalmology experts, R&D professionals and senior executives to maximize the value of new product initiatives. For more information, please visit www.oraclinical.com

About Stuart Therapeutics, Inc.

Stuart Therapeutics’ mission is to provide unique solutions for difficult-to-treat eye diseases. STUART focuses on the research and development of ophthalmic therapeutics based on the PolyCol Collagen Mimetic Peptide (CMP) platform. STUART The first CMP drug in development is ST-100, targeting dry eye disease. ST-100 is expected to be widely applicable to the patient population and is expected to have therapeutic applications in patients, regardless of the underlying cause of their dry eye disease. Stuart continues to focus on global expansion and the development of additional product candidates and technologies in ophthalmology, particularly for the treatment of glaucoma and age-related dry macular degeneration.

For more information, please visit www.StuartTherapeutics.com.

Media contact:
Eric Schlumpf
206-228-2781
eric@stuarttherapeutics.com

Show original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/stuart-therapeutics-inc-announces-successful-phase-2-clinical-trial-results-of-its-novel-dry-eye-candidate-st-100- 301452959.html

SOURCE Stuart Therapeutics

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