Eye surgery – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 17:04:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://web-xpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-150x150.png Eye surgery – Web Xpress http://web-xpress.com/ 32 32 New imaging system could mean near-instant biopsy results: News Center https://web-xpress.com/new-imaging-system-could-mean-near-instant-biopsy-results-news-center/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 17:00:07 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/new-imaging-system-could-mean-near-instant-biopsy-results-news-center/ September 27, 2022 Tissue biopsy with a new imaging system based on 2-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) shows promising results. The system, described in the journal JAMA Dermatology, was developed by University of Rochester biomedical engineer Michael Giacomelli. (Photo courtesy of Giacomelli Laboratory) Biopsies have been performed the same way […]]]>



September 27, 2022


Tissue biopsy with a new imaging system based on 2-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) shows promising results. The system, described in the journal JAMA Dermatology, was developed by University of Rochester biomedical engineer Michael Giacomelli. (Photo courtesy of Giacomelli Laboratory)


Biopsies have been performed the same way since the 19th century, but new technology could allow for point-of-care skin cancer diagnosis.

Medicine has made spectacular progress over the past century. But when it comes to getting biopsy results, very little has changed. Consider, for example, what happens when a patient presents for a skin biopsy for non-melanoma skin cancer.

“The surgeon will remove a small piece of skin,” says Michel Giacomellilecturer in biomedical engineering and optics at the University University of Rochester. “Someone in pathology will look at it weeks or even a month later under a microscope. And then, depending on what they find, the patient is told that it’s fine, don’t worry, or you have to that you come back for a second appointment so that we can treat you.

Giacomelli is developing a new imaging system, contained on a portable cart, to shorten this process to two minutes. This would allow a surgeon to immediately determine if the lesion is cancerous and, if so, “treat the patient in the same visit instead of spreading it out over the next month and multiple visits.”

The system – using two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) – demonstrated remarkable accuracy in a pilot study summarized recently in JAMA Dermatology. When tested on 15 biopsies of known non-melanoma skin cancer, the technology was able to detect basal cell carcinoma with perfect accuracy (sensitivity and specificity of 100%) and squamous cell carcinoma with high accuracy (sensitivity of 89 % and specificity of 100%).

Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common type of human cancer, with more cases per year than all other types of cancer combined in the United States. Eighty percent of non-melanoma skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas.

Applications in “all kinds of scenarios”

Typically, the biopsied tissue is excised, fixed, paraffin (preserved), stained and mounted on slides before being evaluated by a dermatopathologist. “That’s how it’s been since the end of the 19th century,” says Giacomelli. “Billions and billions of biopsies have been performed this way. Everyone is on the same page; It works very well. The problem is that it is very slow.

Giacomelli is now working closely with Associate Professor of Dermatology Sherrif Ibrahim on a follow-up study of 200 patients of the imaging system.

Even when tissue is quickly frozen for faster analysis, surgeons can wait an hour or more for biopsy results to be sure they have completely removed a malignant tumor from a patient still on the operating table. This monopolizes the surgeon’s time and the operating room, while disrupting workflow in busy pathology departments.

Giacomelli sees potential applications for his system in providing rapid biopsy results for all kinds of diseases. “There are all kinds of scenarios,” he says.

For example, “in prostate cases, surgeons often have a very poor idea of ​​what they’re getting into based solely on a prior X-ray or MRI,” says Giacomelli. “You see random cases where they remove the prostate, and sometimes there’s an obvious tumor that has spread beyond the prostate, or other times it’s very localized. This technology provides the ability to adjust patient treatment on the fly. »

The benefit of using TPFM is that it not only generates high-resolution images, but it also uses near-infrared light that penetrates deeper through tissue, making it “advantageous for imaging fresh, irregularly shaped biopsies quickly with minimal preparation,” the article notes. .

Giacomelli now works closely with Cherif Ibrahimassociate professor of dermatology at the university’s medical center, on a larger follow-up study of 200 patients, using randomly collected biopsy specimens at Ibrahim Rochester Dermatology Surgery in Victor, New York.

“The goal is to analyze how the technique works in a real scenario, where many people arrive and all kinds of things can appear,” says Giacomelli. “We really want to make sure there isn’t something weird that normally has nothing to do with cancer that we somehow confuse with cancer or something that has something to do with it. something to do with cancer but that we can’t imagine. You never know what you’re going to find once you start taking random biopsies of people.

Using TPFM imaging to guide surgeries?

Giacomelli has also embarked on a parallel study to see if a new system he developed incorporating TPFM and video can be used to guide surgeries.

The system overlays TPFM images of the site where the tissue is removed onto a webcam image, co-registering what it looks like on the eye with what it would look treated on a slide. “You can show what the excised tissue looks like and how much tumor is on the excision,” says Giacomelli. “They can then map that into the wound they are creating in order to decide which side to cut.”

In addition to Ibrahim, other co-authors of JAMA Dermatology The study includes Vincent Ching-Roa and Chi Huang, graduate students in Giacomelli’s lab, and Bruce Smoller, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine.

The National Institutes of Health funded the project.


Read more

Key words: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Dermatology, featured, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Science, Institute of Optics, Michael Giacomelli, Sherrif Ibrahim

Category: Featured, Science and Technology

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Not enough corneas: fact or fiction? https://web-xpress.com/not-enough-corneas-fact-or-fiction/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 11:05:23 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/not-enough-corneas-fact-or-fiction/ Donor corneal tissue for transplantation is something most American cornea specialists don’t usually worry about, because our eye bank system here is the envy of the world. We have many reputable, well-established and well-managed organizations that do incredible work serving our communities. We can treat our patients with confidence knowing that we can obtain high […]]]>

Donor corneal tissue for transplantation is something most American cornea specialists don’t usually worry about, because our eye bank system here is the envy of the world. We have many reputable, well-established and well-managed organizations that do incredible work serving our communities. We can treat our patients with confidence knowing that we can obtain high quality donor corneal tissue when and where we need it.

But what is the overall situation, with regard to the supply of donor cornea? How can cornea specialists make the most of these resources? How can technological advances change our diagnoses and practice habits?

What we know today: relevant statistics
As doctors (and scientists), we tend to believe in data. A landmark study, published in 2016 in JAMA: Ophthalmology, studied the global corneal transplant landscape. Data collected over a 12-month period in 2012-2013 was obtained from 742 eye banks and analyzed approximately 185,000 corneal transplants in 116 countries. Although this is the most recent and definitive survey of its kind, it is not “new news” – this is where we find the oft-quoted factoid that a single cornea donor eye is available worldwide for 70 diseased eyes.

Not surprisingly, the United States leads the world in corneal transplant rates with 199 patients per million population, followed by Lebanon at 122 per million and Canada at 117 per million, while the median of 116 transplant countries was only 19 per million. In fact, our cornea donor network in the United States is so strong that we are the world’s largest exporter of donor corneas (85% of total exports). It is also, the review authors hypothesize, why American innovation in assistive devices and tissue grafting in the United States is greater than in any other country: we have the resources, the entrepreneurship and the ability to innovate.

Nevertheless, waiting times for transplants and the demand for donor corneas – even in developed countries – are surprisingly long. A 2019 survey, presented at the Canadian National Consensus Conference in February 2020, found that 30% of Canadian transplant surgeons estimate wait times for elective corneal transplants to be over a year.

Which brings us to questions of disease prevalence, diagnostics, and physician practice habits. The JAMA Ophthalmology A survey indicated that approximately 12.7 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with corneal disease (60% of which are Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy, or FECD) and are awaiting a transplant. Another oft-cited NIH/NLM study suggests that 4% of the US population over age 40 is prevalent for FECD, or about 6.5 million people. Yet the EBAA, in its 2021 report, cites fewer than 50,000 corneal transplants performed in the United States. This vast gap – 6.5 million people in the United States who are prevalent with the disease versus less than 50,000 people treated each year – is clearly not just about the available supply of corneas.

How we practice medicine – and how it changes over time

Why is it that even in the United States, where we know we have an adequate supply of corneal tissue, we treat only a small subset of patients with corneal disease? I believe there are several reasons for the current state of practice.

First of all, although it generally has excellent results, endothelial keratoplasty remains invasive: our tendency is to operate only when absolutely necessary. Fortunately, because endothelial disease progresses relatively slowly, patients have greater latitude in choosing an optimal time to undergo this procedure. Additionally, innovations in endothelial keratoplasty have enabled the use of thinner tissue used for less invasive procedures, first via DSAEK and now with DMEK. As a result, DMEK has grown in volume, due to shorter recovery times for patients and excellent results.

However, many corneal specialists consider DMEK to be a more laborious, complex and time-consuming procedure – perhaps another reason for the relatively small annual volume increases. Whatever the reasons for the current state of the practice, it seems that EDC is a category with plenty of room for growth – and more treatment innovations.

What is needed: more research (and more innovation)

I think we’re about to see another wave of innovation, but we need more research to really understand how best to take advantage of these discoveries, especially when it comes to diagnosing and treating corneal dystrophies. Recently, at the April 2022 ASCRS conference, the Aurion Biotech team revealed key findings from a survey they sponsored and conducted by BMC Research.

Of the 1,500 survey respondents (mix of optometrists, ophthalmologists and cataract specialists), more than 60% indicated that they frequently diagnose patients with corneal endothelial disease (CED) (at least 1 to 2 patients per month, and as frequently as 1-2 per week). Nearly half of those who frequently diagnose CEDs are optometrists.

The results of this survey can help us better understand frequency of CED diagnoses, but there is still work to be done to answer the question “so what is going on?” questions. How long after the initial diagnosis do patients wait for further treatment? When does the optometrist refer to an ophthalmologist? When does a patient, in consultation with his ophthalmologist, decide to opt for an intervention such as endothelial keratoplasty? If diagnosis of the disease is relatively common, why aren’t more ophthalmologists performing endothelial keratoplasty? Equally important, how will new innovations affect the current landscape of diagnostic and treatment decisions?

Many of us have heard of the revolutionary corneal endothelial cell therapy invented by Professor Shigeru Kinoshita and his colleagues at Kyoto Prefectural Medical University in Japan, in his articles published in New England Journal of Medicine and Journal of Ophthalmology. Kinoshita and his colleagues were able to reproduce corneal endothelial cells in the laboratory, which these cells do not do in the body. The results of this cell therapy in patients have been excellent – his studies show significant and lasting improvements in corneal edema and visual acuity.

Kinoshita’s innovations have profound supply and demand implications: from a single donor, cells can be replicated to treat up to 100 eyes. Additionally, the cell therapy procedure can be performed relatively quickly (~15-20 minutes), on an outpatient basis. Last year, this cell therapy was acquired by Aurion Biotech, and the company is investing in further clinical development.

If corneal endothelial cell therapy proves to be a viable option for certain corneal endothelial diseases, would ophthalmologists and their patients opt for this procedure, perhaps even earlier in disease progression? Would we use this therapy in eyes undergoing a complex procedure such as a glaucoma procedure that are at risk for corneal insufficiency? If this cell therapy can significantly increase the supply available for treatment, will this change the number of patients treated? What will clinicians and their patients need, in terms of evidence points, to feel comfortable choosing this procedure?

The answers to all of these questions will help us use the precious resources we have more efficiently. Because (of course) there is never enough corneal tissue to meet the needs of patients around the world. As corneal specialists, we have an obligation to do the best we can with what is available to us and to innovate to serve more patients around the world.

Nicole Fram, MD

Email: dfram@avceye.com

Dr. Nicole Fram is Managing Partner of Advanced Vision Care and Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology at the Stein Eye Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is a member of the Medical Advisory Board of Aurion Biotech and CorneaGen. She completed her residency at the prestigious Wills Eye Hospital and served as Co-Chief Resident, followed by a fellowship in Cornea and External Diseases at the Francis I. Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) .

References

1 Note: unless otherwise stated, all statistics quoted in this article come from the JAMA Ophthalmology Survey 2016https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2474372

2 https://bmcproc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12919-021-00215-6

3 https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/fuchs-endothelial-dystrophy/#frequency

4 EBAA: 2021 Eye Banking Statistical Report, Figure 3, p. 3

5 EBAA: 2021 Eye Banking Statistical Report, Table 5, p. 8

6 Kunst, Greg, Aurion Biotech Eyecelerator presentation April 12, 2022

7 https://aurionbiotech.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/NEJMoa1712770.pdf

8 https://aurionbiotech.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/AAO-Journal-Article.pdf

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The Foundation fights pediatric brain tumors https://web-xpress.com/the-foundation-fights-pediatric-brain-tumors/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 22:43:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/the-foundation-fights-pediatric-brain-tumors/ Six-year-old Isaac Clayman is very familiar with the children’s book “Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving?” not just because his mother Samarrah Clayman wrote the story, but because Isaac lived the real thing. “I wrote it a lot for my eldest daughter,” Samarrah Clayman said. hospitalization, and our whole life, our family life, really changed.” […]]]>

Six-year-old Isaac Clayman is very familiar with the children’s book “Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving?” not just because his mother Samarrah Clayman wrote the story, but because Isaac lived the real thing. “I wrote it a lot for my eldest daughter,” Samarrah Clayman said. hospitalization, and our whole life, our family life, really changed.” Samarrah said that just before Isaac’s second birthday, an MRI revealed that he had a brain tumor. Samarrah and her husband Jeffrey, a cardiologist, had noticed a sudden change in their son. “We were playing in the park,” Samarrah said. “He was running around, and we were there for about half an hour, he just kept tripping. “What was really disturbing was that he kind of lost his stability when he was turning,” Jeffrey said. “He also had abnormal eye movements, which kind of bothered me.” Isaac had a marathon operation followed by a month and a half of radiation therapy. “Five days a week, for six weeks,” Samarrah said. “It took like, I would say a year before we felt like it come back to the boy we had known. In 2018, the Claymans started a foundation to help find treatments for ependymoma, Isaac’s diagnosis. action for ependymoma. The Claymans said not all children can benefit as fully as Isaac from these treatments. Their Ependymoma Research Foundation funds the research. it’s a viable project,” Jeffrey said. The profits from “Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving? which brings together local charities, is an important fundraiser for them and a great community building event. Find more information about the race here.

Six-year-old Isaac Clayman is very familiar with the children’s book, “Will Jax be home for Thanksgiving?” not just because his mother Samarrah Clayman wrote the story, but because Isaac lived the real thing.

“I wrote it a lot for my eldest daughter,” Samarrah Clayman said. “She was four when he (Isaac) went through that hospitalization, and our whole life, our family life, was really turned upside down.”

Samarrah said that just before Isaac’s second birthday, an MRI revealed he had a brain tumor. Samarrah and her husband Jeffrey, a cardiologist, had noticed a sudden change in their son.

“We were playing in the park,” Samarrah said. “He was running around, and we stood there for about half an hour, he kept tripping.”

“What was really disturbing was that it kind of lost its stability when it was turning,” Jeffrey said. “He also had abnormal eye movements, which kind of bothered me.”

Isaac underwent a marathon operation followed by a month and a half of radiotherapy.

“Five days a week, for six weeks,” Samarrah said. “It took, I would say, a year before we felt like he was coming back to the boy we had known.”

In 2018, the Claymans started a foundation to help find treatments for ependymoma, Isaac’s diagnosis.

Currently, surgery and radiation therapy are the only courses of action for ependymoma. The Claymans said not all children can benefit as fully as Isaac from these treatments.

Their Ependymoma Research Foundation funds research.

“I review a lot of research and try to select projects that I think could actually turn into something viable,” Jeffrey said.

Product from “Will Jax be home for Thanksgiving?” support the foundation.

Right now, the Claymans are recruiting runners to participate in the GenesisHR Battlegreen Run in Lexington in November.

They said the run, which brings together local charities, is an important fundraiser for them and a great community-building event.

Find more information about the race here.

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Eye surgeon charged with performing surgery despite practice restrictions – The Irish Times https://web-xpress.com/eye-surgeon-charged-with-performing-surgery-despite-practice-restrictions-the-irish-times/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:10:57 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/eye-surgeon-charged-with-performing-surgery-despite-practice-restrictions-the-irish-times/ A disciplinary hearing has started against a UK-based eye surgeon accused of performing cataract surgery in England at a time when his practice was limited to non-clinical work. Dr Arthur Nylander, who is registered to work in Ireland, is also facing allegations that he failed to inform the Irish Medical Council of disciplinary proceedings and […]]]>

A disciplinary hearing has started against a UK-based eye surgeon accused of performing cataract surgery in England at a time when his practice was limited to non-clinical work.

Dr Arthur Nylander, who is registered to work in Ireland, is also facing allegations that he failed to inform the Irish Medical Council of disciplinary proceedings and sanctions against him in another jurisdiction.

Allegations of professional misconduct and poor job performance are heard by the Medical Council’s Fitness to Practice Committee, sitting online.

At a hearing on Thursday, Dr Nylander’s lawyer, Dr Toyin Ogunsanya, said the allegations against his client related to events that took place “far back” in 2013 and 2014, which were the subject of “a thorough investigation” by the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom.

Dr. Nylander has since been cleared by the GMC to practice without conditions. He was unable to attend Wednesday’s hearing because he was working.

Dr Ogunsanya said Dr Nylander admitted the allegations at a GMC hearing and was suspended at the time. He claimed there was a subsequent agreement between Dr Nylander and the Irish Medical Council that sanctions imposed by the GMC in England would automatically be ‘mirrored’ by the Medical Council here.

It was ‘manifestly inappropriate’ for the Medical Council to bring proceedings against Dr Nylander after 10 years when most of the allegations against him had been admitted and corrective action had been taken, he argued. .

The fitness to practice hearing should be about Dr. Nylander today, not about what happened 10 years ago. “We are all human and we all make mistakes, but those were dealt with by the GMC,” he told the hearing.

Eoghan O’Sullivan, for the Medical Council’s chief executive, said only some of the allegations currently facing Dr Nylander had been investigated by the GMC in Britain. He denied that the Medical Council entered into an agreement of the type described with Dr Nylander regarding the GMC process.

He said it was not unusual for the Medical Council to consider issues that had been referred to regulators in other countries.

Dr Ogunsanya argued that the hearing should not take place because his client understood that the agreement he had reached with the Medical Council covered all the allegations he had made.

Legal Assessor Patricia Dillon SC said the allegations against Dr Nylander were very serious and involved allegations of dishonesty. The request not to open the hearing was made “very late in the day”, but it was important.

After a break to consider submissions, committee chair Paul Harkin adjourned proceedings until a date within the next two weeks when full evidence will be heard at Dr Ogunsanya’s request.

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Our Grand Duke is going blind and needs surgery https://web-xpress.com/our-grand-duke-is-going-blind-and-needs-surgery/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 07:14:42 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/our-grand-duke-is-going-blind-and-needs-surgery/ Help save our Grand Duke’s sight Bubo the Eurasian Eagle Owl (Eeo) was born in a living room and hand raised from day one. He was used for falconry a few years in his youth. He wowed thousands with his silent aerial flights above the public for 18 years. He would melt your heart if […]]]>

Help save our Grand Duke’s sight

Bubo the Eurasian Eagle Owl (Eeo) was born in a living room and hand raised from day one. He was used for falconry a few years in his youth. He wowed thousands with his silent aerial flights above the public for 18 years. He would melt your heart if you met him. He hugs you when you walk with him. He cares about people so much that once a volunteer who was having chemo ended up feeding Bubo on the glove. We managers could “feel” Bubo sending him energy.

Bubo is the largest owl species in the world; twice the size of any owl in the United States. Unfortunately, Bubo quickly loses his sight due to cataracts. Normally, he could see a rabbit hiding in the brush 3 km away, day or night. His eyes still react to light, but his right eye has severe visual impairment due to a cataract covering it, and now his left eye is developing one. An owl’s sight and hearing are the 2 factors that allow it to survive in the wild. Losing one means a slow death for a wild bird. Luckily, Bubo is part of a non-profit organization in Missouri that has been using birds for education since 1970. He won’t have to worry about not finding food, because we’re waiting tooth and nail. on our birds!

Notice the cloudiness over the right eye

In humans, we think of cataracts that develop with age. Bubo is only 18, and the longest-lived eagle owl in captivity lived to be 68. We had one of our vets draw blood to make sure there was no underlying problem causing the cataract. It could be hereditary as blood tests looked good.

Bubo’s cataract completely covers his right eye and develops one in his left eye. Because it affects his peripheral vision, a noise to the right will startle him – he will twitch or rip the glove off. Sometimes it misses a branch it is flying towards. Eventually, he will need to be placed in a smaller cage to prevent him from breaking a wing or a leg. If he were a wild owl, losing his sight would mean he would starve.

Watch the video below of Bubo flying over the audience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLVxwXFi2Lc/

Every penny of this fundraiser will support Bubo’s eye restoration, as well as post-operative prescriptions and care. Postoperative care will cost a few hundred dollars; many eye drops to prevent infection and cystoid macular edema (blood vessels in your retina leak fluid into a part of your eye called the macula and cause a buildup of fluid that causes your macula to swell or edema in the eye ).

The birds of Wings of Love, Inc. (WoL) Bird Shows and Rescue have been presented to the public since 1970. Yvonne Patterson-Burbach is a horticulturist and former rainforest photojournalist. She brings people closer to nature with her birds by reminding them of the natural gifts we share with the animal world. WoL birds roller skate, ride a high wire bike, spell words, hoist the flag, sing songs, talk at the right time and much more.

At the end of each show, Bubo flies low over the heads of the audience participants. It flies so low that people think its legs are touching the top of their head. In reality, it is the leather jesses that allow handlers to keep it on the glove while walking it.

Watch the video below as our female eagle owl Swoop flies over an audience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UG7v7Pw9W9U/

WoL employees nicknamed Bubo “FeatherPuppy” because he is so affectionate. He delivered wedding rings to the bride and groom. During owl breeding season (January – March) while carrying its delicious dinner (a thawed rat), it comes beside its surroundings, closes its big eyes and offers it to its masters by gently moving its head high downstairs. . That’s what he would do if he brought food to the chicks in the nest.

The urgency in Bubo’s fundraising is that as soon as the cataract in his left eye develops, the veterinary ophthalmologist wants to operate on both of his eyes. Birds are very delicate; some birds die on the operating table and some never come out of anesthesia. So doing surgery is a bit safer. In veterinary care, they don’t have the machinery to develop intraocular lenses to put on their eyes after cataract removal, like surgeons do with humans. They tried this on wild owls but they slipped causing great pain.

Bubo and most other owls see with binocular vision, which gives them the ability to see height, width, and depth. Some owls don’t need amazing eyesight to hunt, such as barn owls that locate their prey by acoustic location in total darkness. Researchers actually blindfolded barn owls, releasing mice to see if they would catch them. They narrowly missed the first try, but the second attempt caught the mice.

We started putting drops in Bubo’s eyes daily. After his operation he will have many drops to prevent infections etc. to place in his eyes. We try to get him used to it. It’s easier to put them in the right eye where he can’t see. The cost of antibiotics and eye drops will be quite high.

In closing, we would like to remind you not to use rodenticides. It kills more than mice and rats. It kills all kinds of birds of prey, cats and dogs that feed on dying or dead animals. Used rodenticides are twice as painful for untargeted victims.

The eye doctor said Bubo’s vision will never be great, but he will see like most of us see without our glasses. Even that little bit of vision, compared to what he’s been used to, will be a blessing. We can’t afford it without the help of our friends – that is YOU! Allow us to thank you in advance.

BE WISE! PLEASE HELP OUR EYES.

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Oklahoma Joe: Keeping tabs on optimism despite worries https://web-xpress.com/oklahoma-joe-keeping-tabs-on-optimism-despite-worries/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 23:34:03 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/oklahoma-joe-keeping-tabs-on-optimism-despite-worries/ Joe Hight He was gone when I woke up in Clayton, New Mexico. For the second time in my life, a gas bubble that held my retina in place after surgery to repair it was gone after 70 days. I now faced the reality that my sight would never be the same again. Nan and […]]]>

Joe Hight

He was gone when I woke up in Clayton, New Mexico. For the second time in my life, a gas bubble that held my retina in place after surgery to repair it was gone after 70 days.

I now faced the reality that my sight would never be the same again.

Nan and I had stopped in Clayton for the night en route to southern Colorado for a quick trip, less than two days. The trip had been canceled three weeks earlier by my surgeon, Dr. Brian Phelps, because the eye had developed glaucoma and the bulla had not completely gone away.

After waking up, I realized that vision was blurry in my left eye, sometimes resembling that of a prism. The week before, Dr. M. Andrew Hough told me that my vision would never be the same even with correction. I also had to take drops for the pressure and the redness that remained in my eye after the operation. The result was very different from the first surgery when my vision returned to normal.

Doctors fear my right eye will do the same.

“You’re going to have to learn to see with your right eye,” Hough said.

For the past 70 days, I hadn’t been able to do much except walk around and water the plants outside. I had continuous migraines caused by the loop (described as a rubber band) around my eyeball. I couldn’t do my favorite hobbies like reading books because it strained my eyesight. Nan drove me everywhere. I had trouble seeing the computer screen to write this column.

I was afraid of possibly losing my sight. I was downstairs. So I contacted a friend, Penny Owen, who has lost much of her sight to multiple sclerosis. I wrote to him about my concerns. I told him about the column I had originally written about it.

Penny’s response changed my mindset.

“Joe, what is your biggest fear when it comes to losing a large part of your sight? Is this likely to happen? At first, my biggest fear was that I would never regain my normal sight. Once I accepted that I never would, my fear of losing my sight further became predominant. Now I’m just grateful for adjusting to the little sight I have. We live in great times to lose your sight, actually. Can’t drive? Someone else can drive, even Uber. Not sure where you’re going (especially at night) or feeling unstable? someone’s arm or asking a stranger for help. They won’t mind; in fact, they like to help if they can,” she wrote.

“…I’ve always seen you as a resilient, curious guy and a glass half full. I will think of you and hope for the best possible result. …I’ll leave you with the title of the late Gilda Radner’s book, ‘It’s Always Something.’ Is not it? Some are worse than others, some come and go. We survive and probably grow wiser from it all.

She was right. I started to think more optimistically. I can drive and use my right eye more. I bump into things on my left side and can’t recognize people from a distance. But that’s minor when you consider what the others are up against.

The first day of fall, my favorite time of year, will be Thursday. It means the long summer is over. I look forward to the days ahead, with more limited eyes.

Joe Hight is a director and member of the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame, editor who led a Pulitzer Prize-winning project, chair of the journalism ethics chair at University of Central Oklahoma, president/owner of The best of books author of ‘Unnecessary Sorrow’ and senior editor/editor of ‘Our Greatest Journalists’.

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Robots are increasingly becoming medical assistants https://web-xpress.com/robots-are-increasingly-becoming-medical-assistants/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:33:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/robots-are-increasingly-becoming-medical-assistants/ This technology-assisted procedure offers more precision and accuracy with less blood loss in addition to a shorter hospital stay This technology-assisted procedure offers more precision and accuracy with less blood loss in addition to a shorter hospital stay When a 66-year-old lecturer from Hosapete was advised by doctors to undergo knee replacement surgery for his […]]]>

This technology-assisted procedure offers more precision and accuracy with less blood loss in addition to a shorter hospital stay

This technology-assisted procedure offers more precision and accuracy with less blood loss in addition to a shorter hospital stay

When a 66-year-old lecturer from Hosapete was advised by doctors to undergo knee replacement surgery for his chronic pain, the first question that bothered him was how long he could get back on his feet.

“I have heard that people cannot walk on their own for at least a month after the operation. I don’t want to be dependent on others for so long,” he told doctors.

When doctors at SPARSH hospitals, where he was undergoing treatment, told him that his recovery would be less painful and faster with robotic joint replacement surgery, he opted for it. “His knee replacement was performed using Mako Robotic-Arm assisted technology that allows surgeons to replicate precise bone cuts for patients, every time, first in a virtual 3D model and then in the operating room. He is upright, able to walk on his own in two weeks,” said Ravikumar Mukartihal, a robotic joint replacement surgeon at the hospital.

He said this technology-assisted procedure offers more precision and accuracy with less blood loss, in addition to a shorter hospital stay.

“In the event of knee or hip surgery, the Mako System software makes it possible to create a 3D model of the diseased joint based on the patient’s CT scan. The software then makes it possible to create a personalized virtual surgical plan for each patient, based on their specific disease state. This planning, done even before entering the operating room, helps to decide on the most accurate bone cuts and implant alignment,” explained Dr. Mukartihal.

Various specialties

Robotic surgeries are now offered in various specialties such as organ transplantation, surgical oncology, urology, gynecology, surgical gastroenterology, general surgery, pediatric surgery or ophthalmology.

Vishal Rao US, Director of Head Neck Oncology – Robotic Surgery at the HCG Cancer Center, recalled, “During my formative years, I only had two small eyes and two large hands at my disposal. Today, I have a robot assisting me with a big, powerful eye and two small nimble hands.

Somashekhar SP, Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board and Global Director of the Aster International Institute of Oncology, said more patients are now accepting robotic surgeries mainly due to shorter hospital stay, lower risk of complications and a quick recovery. “Last year, 100 new robots were introduced in India in private and public hospitals,” he said.

Smart tools

Naren Shetty, vice president and head of cataract and refractive surgery at Narayana Nethralaya, said robotic-assisted smart tools are widely used in ophthalmology. “Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery is an innovative bladeless surgical option for cataract patients. In this surgery, a laser machine is first used to make the incisions, create an opening in the lens capsule and break the cataract into smaller pieces. These incisions are precise, consistent and safer than manual incisions,” he said.

Mohammed Rehan Sayeed, Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery Consultant at Manipal Hospitals (Yeshwantpur and Hebbal), said robotics are also widely used in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery. “In case of bypass, the robot helps to remove the conduits, and without making a large incision or cutting through the sternum (with a small 5cm incision),” he said.

A word of warning

Hema Divakar, chair of the FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Well Woman Healthcare Committee, said the growing popularity of robotic surgery may lead to an increase in irrational demand from female patients, which puts undue pressure on the surgeon. “This can lead to the irrational use of robotic surgery for fear of missing out. Apart from the cost of the machine, the expense involved in setting up a dedicated robotic surgery facility is colossal. The recurring cost instruments is much more concerning,” she said.

As a result, the costs of robotic surgeries remain high. “In fact, right now open/laparoscopic surgeries are much more cost effective than robotic surgeries,” she said.

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The Fiji Times » Birisita’s eyesight restored; best birthday gift https://web-xpress.com/the-fiji-times-birisitas-eyesight-restored-best-birthday-gift/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 07:35:12 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/the-fiji-times-birisitas-eyesight-restored-best-birthday-gift/ Regaining her sight after living with visual impairment for the past nine years was the best birthday present for Birisita Vota. Paula Vota, her delighted father, said it was a huge relief to know that the pain and struggles she had endured at home and at school were finally over. Birisita, who just turned nine, […]]]>

Regaining her sight after living with visual impairment for the past nine years was the best birthday present for Birisita Vota.

Paula Vota, her delighted father, said it was a huge relief to know that the pain and struggles she had endured at home and at school were finally over.

Birisita, who just turned nine, was one of 18 children who underwent cataract surgery at the Pacific Eye Institute this week.

“When she was in first grade, we noticed something was wrong with her eye,” Mr Vota said.

“After being checked, we learned that the problem started from his left eye.”

Mr Vota said early surgery had given his daughter a bright future.

“We are so lucky that Birisita was able to have surgery because she didn’t want to go to school because she had a lot of difficulties in terms of reading and writing.

“It’s the best birthday present – the gift of restored sight and we’re so grateful it’s free.”

He said one of the biggest challenges he faced as a father was being unable to do anything when Birisita was in pain.

“To ease his pain, we used to encourage him to eat lots of fruit.”

Mr. Vota’s advice to all parents was to spend time with their children and make sure they were getting a healthy diet.

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Could the Cowboys have their eye on a Broncos QB? https://web-xpress.com/could-the-cowboys-have-their-eye-on-a-broncos-qb/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:49:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/could-the-cowboys-have-their-eye-on-a-broncos-qb/ The Denver Broncos have three quarterbacks on their roster and the Dallas Cowboys, who suddenly need one, might consider taking one. The Dallas Cowboys lost their season opener 19-3 to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday Night Football, but lost more than the game. Reports came out just after the game ended that Jerry Jones […]]]>

The Denver Broncos have three quarterbacks on their roster and the Dallas Cowboys, who suddenly need one, might consider taking one.

The Dallas Cowboys lost their season opener 19-3 to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday Night Football, but lost more than the game. Reports came out just after the game ended that Jerry Jones said his starting quarterback, Dak Prescott, was going to need surgery on the hand he injured during the game.

ESPN’s Todd Archer reported that Prescott could miss 6-8 weeks, which means the Cowboys will be looking for another quarterback to start for at least half the season.

There are already quarterbacks in the Cowboys organization who would be the obvious choices, like Cooper Rush or Will Grier, but let’s be honest, those aren’t the sexiest options.

A guy like Jimmy Garoppolo would cost quite a bit in a trade. But a guy currently on the Broncos’ practice squad, Josh Johnson, is a guy who makes sense and he’s on that. list of potential replacements compiled by Eric Edholm of NFL.com.

Jones is a proud owner who won’t want to throw in the towel after a game. He knows Rush is a major downgrade at quarterback, but he might not want to pay the price to trade for a guy like Garoppolo.

August 20, 2022; Orchard Park, New York, USA; Denver Broncos quarterback Josh Johnson (11) returns to pass in the first quarter of a preseason game against the Buffalo Bills at Highmark Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark Konezny-USA TODAY Sports

He could look to a middle ground and pick a guy like Johnson who, if he stays on the practice squad, could literally be had for nothing.

Johnson lost the backup job in Denver to Brett Rypien, but the Cowboys would struggle to find a more experienced passer at this time of year as Johnson has played for 14 different NFL teams.

It would still be likely that the Cowboys would consider acquiring Johnson as they might see their inside options be better, but it’s an idea they could go to in dire straits.

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Newcastle dog gets facelift as heavy folds of skin have caused him restricted vision and painful ulcers https://web-xpress.com/newcastle-dog-gets-facelift-as-heavy-folds-of-skin-have-caused-him-restricted-vision-and-painful-ulcers/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://web-xpress.com/newcastle-dog-gets-facelift-as-heavy-folds-of-skin-have-caused-him-restricted-vision-and-painful-ulcers/ Heavy folds of skin on Bentley’s forehead once impacted this young pup’s daily life. The two-year-old Clumber Spaniel suffered from painful corneal ulcers and his vision had become so restricted that he once ran into the brick wall of a bus stop. The heavy folds of skin were forcing his eyelids inward and ulcers were […]]]>

Heavy folds of skin on Bentley’s forehead once impacted this young pup’s daily life.

The two-year-old Clumber Spaniel suffered from painful corneal ulcers and his vision had become so restricted that he once ran into the brick wall of a bus stop. The heavy folds of skin were forcing his eyelids inward and ulcers were developing due to his fur resting in his eye.

But now the young Bentley is much happier and preparing for a brighter and clearer future after undergoing a facelift to remove its creases. And its owners Anthony and Fiona Robson, from Newcastle, are delighted with the new Bentley look.

Read more: Tragedy as ‘loving’ Sunderland man with terminal cancer dies just weeks after marrying love of his life

Anthony said: “Before the operation, Bentley frequently kept his eyes closed and actually walked into a brick bus stop one morning. The difference after the operation was amazing! He started looking around when we we walked around like everything was new!”

“It has also helped his confidence, although it’s still a work in progress, as his poor vision before the operation caused him to be wary of strangers and dogs. He is much better now.”

Bentley underwent delicate surgery at Linnaeus-owned Veterinary Vision in Cumbria. This involved careful planning to ensure that his facelift prevented him from encountering similar problems later in life, but also to avoid overcorrection, which could prevent Bentley from blinking properly.



Bentley one month after the operation

Veterinary Vision Clinical Director Chris Dixon said: “Bentley was a difficult dog to examine prior to surgery due to his restricted vision and ongoing eye discomfort. Heavy folds of skin along his forehead and around his his eyes grew corneal hairs and he subsequently developed corneal ulceration.

“The surgery was complex and involved the resection of the skin folds of his forehead. We performed a modified eyebrow suspension to prevent the remaining skin from sliding forward and followed this with bilateral upper and lower eyelid surgery to prevent the eyelids to roll over.

“Precise planning of the procedure was critical to success because over-correction could potentially prevent Bentley from blinking normally and lead to other complications, and under-correction would not improve his quality of life.

“Everything went well and Bentley’s recovery was excellent, and the shy, nervous and aggressive behavior that we had experienced before the operation disappeared overnight. His owners were extremely diligent with his post-operative care and I’m glad he’s now on treatment-free.

“He has been a fantastic patient, and the whole team at Veterinary Vision is delighted that he has made a full recovery.”



Bentley six months after the operation
Bentley six months after the operation

Bentley owner Fiona added: “We are very grateful for the fantastic job [the team] did for Bentley to give him a different outlook on life and a brighter future.

“He has been transformed and it’s lovely to see him running on the beach, a very happy dog. We wouldn’t hesitate to recommend Veterinary Vision to other customers as their service was very professional and they took great care of Bentleys.”

Veterinary Vision, which has centers in Penrith, Sunderland and Charnock Richard, performs all types of eye surgery with its ophthalmologists offering extensive experience and knowledge of eye conditions in small animals, equines and farm animals.

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